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Roast of Goat, and minty / lime dessert

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Topic by jroot posted 05-18-2009 10:11 AM 3334 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jroot

5121 posts in 3507 days
hardiness zone 5a

05-18-2009 10:11 AM

Topic tags/keywords: recipes goat mint

The following is what we did with our roast of goat. I took several recipes, and modified them, and I also admit to being coached by my son ( a chef ) over the phone. After it comes a recipe for a lime dessert with fresh mint from the garden.

Leg of Goat
Why eat goat? Because goat is high in protein, but low in calories, fat and cholesterol. The below nutritional information was taken from the “USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference.” All examples are for 100 grams of roasted meat [composite of retail cuts, skin included with the chicken].
Cooked Meat Energy Protein Fat Sodium Cholesterol
Goat 143 calories 27 grams 3 grams 86 mg 75 mg
Beef 305 calories 26 grams 21 grams 62 mg 88 mg
Chicken 223 calories 24 grams 13 grams 73 mg 76 mg
Pork 273 calories 27 grams 17 grams 62 mg 91 mg
A goat carcass rarely has much subcutaneous fat to protect it from drying. Goat meat is generally quite lean although its higher moisture content makes it tender when handled properly. The meat of adult goats is almost always subjected to stewing because of its relative toughness, but in stews it is flavorful and tender.
For safety, cook ground goat meat to 160° F, or until juices are clear with no trace of pink or cloudiness. Roasts, steaks and chops can be cooked to medium rare (145° F), medium (160° F) or well done (170° F). Less tender cuts should be braised (roasted or simmered with a small amount of liquid in a tightly covered pan) or stewed.

Southwest Leg of Goat
1 leg of goat (5 to 7 lbs), boned & cut to fit pan 1 tsp rosemary
1 c wine 1 tsp sage
1 c vegetable oil 1/2 tsp crushed pepper
2 garlic cloves, skin removed 1 bay leaf, crumbled
2 tsp salt 3 onions
2 garlic cloves, skin removed Some carrot and celery for braising.
 Combine vinegar, oil and seasonings and pour over goat. Cover and marinate in refrigerator 12 to 24 hours, turning often.
 Remove goat, strain marinade, discard the oil and reserve.
 Season the leg with the salt.
 Braise or sear the leg, and then remove to a plate.
 Cook some carrot, celery, onion, and garlic with 1 TBL of flour. Swish around.
 Add a little more wine to the marinade after the oil has been removed from it. Add marinade to the vegetables.
 Reduce the liquid by 1/2.
 Add goat back into the liquid and top up with chicken broth. Bring this to a boil.
 Cover it and place into oven at 325F for about 3 hours.
 Turn meat partway through or after about 1 ½ hours.
 Can be cooked ahead, and reheated at 325 for 45 minutes or so.
 Make gravy from reduced juice.

Minty Lime Freeze

Prep Time: 15 min
Total Time: 3 hr 15 min
Makes: 12 servings, 1 piece (73 g) each
What You Need!
1 pkg. (250 g) PHILADELPHIA Brick Cream Cheese, softened
1/2 cup sugar, divided
1 pkg. (85 g) JELL-O Lime Jelly Powder
1 Tbsp. lime zest
1/4 cup fresh lime juice
3/4 cup thawed COOL WHIP Whipped Topping
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh mint
1-1/2 cups graham wafer crumbs
6 Tbsp. butter, melted

LINE 9-inch round pan with plastic wrap, with ends extending over side of pan.
Beat cream cheese and 1/4 cup sugar in large bowl with mixer until well blended.
Add dry jelly powder, zest and juice; mix well.
WHISK in Cool Whip and mint; spoon into prepared pan.
Mix graham wafer crumbs, remaining sugar and butter; sprinkle over jelly mixture.
Cover dessert with ends of plastic wrap; use to gently press crumb mixture into jelly mixture.

FREEZE 3 hours or until firm.
Remove dessert from freezer 15 min. before serving; invert onto plate.
Remove pan and plastic wrap. Let dessert stand at room temperature to soften slightly before cutting to serve.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown



View Bunting's profile

Bunting

822 posts in 3601 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-18-2009 10:32 AM

I had goat stew in Dominican Republic. It wasn’t bad but I had a hard time getting it down.

Goat meat is not in our stores that I know off. Don’t think I am going to go look for it any time soon.

But I think it was the idea of goats being kept for pets in some cases. My mind kept going to my neigbours cute goats they raise for milk and yes they are pets too.

-- NS Zone 5B 200 KM East of Halifax cheers Bunting------Having a place to go – is a home. Having someone to love – is a family.

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3648 days
hardiness zone 6b

05-18-2009 10:47 AM

Hey J.. Did you ever try that mint jelly recipe for use on your lamb? Think you’d said something of it.. Wondering how it was if you’d had the chance yet.

I don’t think I’d ever had goat meat… Maybe some day. ;)

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View mmh's profile

mmh

332 posts in 3405 days
hardiness zone 7a

05-18-2009 10:54 AM

Sounds good! So, the healthy choice of eating goat balanced out the fats and carbs in the dessert? It sounds like it was a delicious meal.

So, does that mean I’m too late for dinner . . . . ? }:(~

-- A weed is a plant that is growing where it was not purposefully placed by human hands.

View jroot's profile

jroot

5121 posts in 3507 days
hardiness zone 5a

05-18-2009 11:01 AM

Yes, Scott. It did indeed try your mint jelly with our lamb. It has a wonderful taste. I think that I would increase the getatin content, but the flavour is divine with mint. Thanks for that.

Mmh, there is not much goat left. Sorry about that. ... just enough to make a nice goat curry for the two of us. Too bad you live so far away. ;)

Bunting, if you don’t know the goat personally, there is NO PROBLEM.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3648 days
hardiness zone 6b

05-18-2009 11:16 AM

I often wonder about the chickens, when they stop producing eggs, if I’d have any problem eating them… Right now, I don’t think I would… When the time comes to process them and rotate in new birds? Not so sure. ;)

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View jroot's profile

jroot

5121 posts in 3507 days
hardiness zone 5a

05-18-2009 12:23 PM

Scott, when mine stopped laying, I thought that we could eat them, but alas, we found it very difficult. One gets attached to them. Also, they were layers, and not roasters, so they were only good for stewing.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

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