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Canadian regulators fail to protect a priceless pollinator from a known toxin

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Topic by Bob posted 2083 days ago 1092 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bob

1427 posts in 2346 days
hardiness zone 3b

2083 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: resource tip bees hive collapse

This, just in from a topic discussed at some length earilier this year.

Dec.2, 2008
The crop chemical, clothianidin, approved almost five years ago by the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, has since been found to be “highly toxic to the honeybee, apis mellifera.”

Despite knowing this for at least four years, the PMRA, a division of Health Canada, has kept the product’s temporary license in place. So it continues to be used .

Bob

-- I want to believe in a lot of things but, in the meantime I have to deal with the truth



View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14682 posts in 2598 days
hardiness zone 5b

2083 days ago

sigh.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Bon's profile

Bon

7374 posts in 2378 days
hardiness zone 5a

2083 days ago

And yet another bad call by one of our gov’t. agencies.Will it ever stop?

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

View MIKE CRIPPS's profile

MIKE CRIPPS

404 posts in 2373 days

2082 days ago

I CAN UNDERSTAND BOBS AND OTHER MEMBERS POINTS OF VIEW WHEN THE SMALLEST YET THE THE MOST VITAL TINY INSECTS THAT ALL HAVE A ROLE TO PLAY IN OUR PLANT LIFE COULD BE WIPED OUT , OUR PLANET WILL THEN BE IN A SORRY STATE. AT THE END OF THE DAY WE MUST ACCEPT THAT OLD FASHIONED METHODS GROWING NATURAL FOODS WITHOUT CHEMICAL INTERFERANCE IS GOING TO COST MORE .
THER IS A MASSIVE SWING IN BRITAIN BACK TO ORGANIC PRODUCE AND MEAT BEING PRODUCED IN BETTER LIFE STYLE CONDITIONS FOR THE ANIMALS AND BIRDS ALSO PEOPLE GROWING THEIR OWN VEGETABLES FOR THE FIRST TIME.
WE HAVE VERY STICT LAWS IN THE UK RE FERTILISERS AND OTHER CHEMICALS MOST FARMERS ALL SEEM TO DO THEIR BIT AROUND MANY FIELDS NOW THRE IS A 5 METRE MARGIN LEFT NATURAL FOR THE WILDLIFE AND MANY OF THE HEDGEROWS THAT WERE PULLED UP HAVE NOW BEEN RE-INSTATED.
REGARDS MIKE

-- MIKE MILTON COMMON U.K.

View Bob's profile

Bob

1427 posts in 2346 days
hardiness zone 3b

2082 days ago

I HEAR YOU MIKE BUT WHO LET THE LAND GET TO THIS STATE IN THE FIRST PLACE?

Once agian, the bureaucracy has intervened where they have no ability, training or expertise.

I fear these pygmies more than all the Monsantos put together.

“A lot of what is called ‘public service’ consists of making hoops for other people to jump through. It is a great career for those who cannot feel fulfilled unless they are telling other people what to do.”—Thomas Sowell

-- I want to believe in a lot of things but, in the meantime I have to deal with the truth

View Greenthumb's profile

Greenthumb

2287 posts in 2417 days

2082 days ago

Bob

I watched a program on honey bees last night. The almost total collapse of the bees across the USA (80 % in 37 states).............quite frightening and that chemical seemed to be the culprit. Almost all fruit berries and vegatbles rely on the bee for pollination and without the bee our grocery stores would be empty.

people blame the politicians when in fact it is most often the pernemant bureaucrats and they will not stop until the country is laid to waste.

Great Britain was, at the time of the show,................free from the honey bee collapse but there were signs that they had the begginings of what people saw here.

I cant imagine life without a good bottle of vino

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

View MIKE CRIPPS's profile

MIKE CRIPPS

404 posts in 2373 days

2081 days ago

our bees are about 30% down in numbers money is currently being made available for intensive research by one of our universities. the Honey bees across the world under threat because of virulent viruses transferred
by the varroa mite. Nearly all colonies in the wild have died out and without
beekeepers to care for them honey bees could disappear in a few years.
Dr Ivor Davis, Master Beekeeper and trustee of the British Beekeepers
Association suggests ten things which everyone can do to help preserve our
honey bees.
1. Ask your MP to lobby for more funds for bee health research
Beekeepers are worried that not enough is known to combat the diseases that affect honey
bees. Bee pollination contributes £165 million to the agricultural economy. The BBKA has
costed a five-year £8 million programme to secure the information to save our bees. During this
period, honey bee pollination will contribute more than £800 million to the government coffers –
yet the government only spends £200,000 annually on honey bee research. Even DEFRA
Minister, Lord Rooker, who holds the purse strings to finance this, has said without this extra
research we could lose our honey bees within 10 years. Sign the BBKA petition and write to
MPs to support The Bee Health Research Funding Campaign. Campaign details are on
www.britishbee

-- MIKE MILTON COMMON U.K.

View Bunting's profile

Bunting

822 posts in 2322 days
hardiness zone 5b

2072 days ago

At the end they were suspecting a toxin that killed the bees. I read something about this

I am not surprised

IMOP. The bee is the most important living thing on this earth

The laws in Nova SCotia are so stiff what we can’t use as fertilizers and peticidess

In fact no chemicals are allowed to be used at all

I have never never in all my 25-30 years of gardening have ever used a chemical

And people talk about my crops of veggies. I have far more than I can use but I love to grow them

MY composting system is so simple and yet healthy. Plain old straw does wonders to the earth yet one huge bale is so cheap $6.00

I had someone til my gardens the past 2 years and he couldn’t get over my rich looe soil. Straw, just straw but by Spring it is all broken down then I add my compost

Now that my soil is all nice and loosened. I won’t have him til again. Tilling cuts up the worms

In winter I need to walk quite a distance through snow to get to the compost bins so I just put my veggie and fruit stuff under the layers of straw in the garden beds. BY Spring it is all broken down into the soil straw and all.

Could it be any more simpler?? I don’t think

-- NS Zone 5B 200 KM East of Halifax cheers Bunting------Having a place to go – is a home. Having someone to love – is a family.

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