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Putting straw on straw berry plants

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Topic by nate22 posted 10-07-2013 01:21 PM 2239 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nate22

88 posts in 2339 days

10-07-2013 01:21 PM

Should I put straw on my straw berry plants or don’t I have to. If I do when should I put it on. And should I cover the whole plant. Any help would be helpfull.

-- Nathan, Middlebury, In. www.knfurniture.blogspot.com



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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3014 days
hardiness zone 5b

10-08-2013 05:51 AM

Where there are gaps between plants,I put mulch (wood chips or composted goat manure/straw) around my strawberry plants but I do not cover them. I do it mostly to feed the soil and to prevent any winter exposure to the soil rather than to offer temperature protection. Both the wild and cultivated strawberries seem to survive our winters without any cover over the plants themselves.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3572 days

10-14-2013 06:03 PM

all is fair in love and plants ?

they always thank you when you make their bed ?

when they die off, and their arms scream “dead”, cover their feet with straw

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

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nate22

88 posts in 2339 days

02-24-2014 04:40 AM

I’m wanting to know something. This winter were I live in northern Indiana we have got a lot of snow this year. We usually will get some then it will melt and then get more but it doesn’t stick around like it has this year. And we got a lot more snow this year than we usually do to. We will usually get 2 to 3 feet over the whole winter, but this year we got close to 5 feet just in the month of January. What I want to know is when all the snow melts will it ruin my strawberry plants from getting to wet.

-- Nathan, Middlebury, In. www.knfurniture.blogspot.com

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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3014 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-24-2014 06:50 AM

Hello Nate,
We generally have a quite a bit of snow every winter too, usually around five or six feet over the entire winter season, and sometimes warm weather will melt the snow cover quickly. I haven’t ever noticed that my strawberry plants have suffered due to extreme snow melt. Do you have bare ground around the strawberry plants? If the snow melts quickly and the snow melt is enough to erode the soil around your plants, your plants might suffer. You can remedy this by making sure you don’t have any bare soil around your strawberries, either by allowing the plants to grow very close together to act as a ground cover or cover the bare areas around the plants with straw or mulch to prevent erosion. If water is pooling around your strawberries, even submerging them during the snow melt, I would try using raised beds next year to keep the root crowns above the water level. Plants need air and if they are submerged for too long, they will drown. I have my strawberries growing in raised beds and my yard is slightly sloped, so drainage isn’t a problem for me. I hope your strawberry plants will be okay.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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nate22

88 posts in 2339 days

02-25-2014 04:57 AM

Thanks radicalfarmergal, it sounds like from what you said I should be ok. My strawberry plants grew enough last summer that the were starting to grow into each other covering the ground between each plant. And where I live we have sandy ground to so water soaks into the ground fairly quickly. I will just have to wait and see what happens.

-- Nathan, Middlebury, In. www.knfurniture.blogspot.com

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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3014 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-25-2014 05:05 AM

Looking out the window at all our snow, I am dreaming of warm, sunny May days and the taste of sweet, ripe strawberries. Now that your plants have had a year to establish themselves, I hope you have an abundant and delicious strawberry harvest this spring.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

882 posts in 2849 days
hardiness zone 4a

02-25-2014 07:01 AM

Where I am, the ground is frozen to a good deep level over the winter. The ground is unworkable for about a good month after the snow melts. The melting snow probably runs off more than it soaks in and so there is no danger of having anything too wet. But I am also on sandy soil so when it does melt finally, it doesn’t stay wet for long.
Heavy snow cover is actually a good thing in a cold winter. The snow insulates. I’m certain that some perennial plants here would not survive the winter as well than if it were cold with no snow cover.

In any case, as long as your strawberries are not already in a low lying boggy area, extra snow would not be an issue, and your plants will always appreciate a nice bed of straw around them. I used to give mine a bed of pine needles to keep the weeds down, feed the strawberries and keep them from drying out – in other words all the things that every mulch does, but strawberries in particular like the acidity created by pine needles.

-- Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. - Thoreau

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nate22

88 posts in 2339 days

02-25-2014 11:10 AM

Radicalfarmergal, I’m the same way looking out my window and thinking about working in the garden. I’m going to buy 5 more plants and add those to the ones I already have. I want to put them the length of my garden. Which is a 100 feet long. I’ll need a lot because my family and my wife’s family eats them to.

-- Nathan, Middlebury, In. www.knfurniture.blogspot.com

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nate22

88 posts in 2339 days

02-25-2014 11:15 AM

Daltxguy, I’m the same way. The top of the ground doesn’t stay wet long the water will soak in fairly fast. And I forgot but the snow would help them when the winters are cold. We had a colder winter than what we normally do. Month of January was 15 degrees or colder. We usually don’t have those kinds of temperatures here in northern Indiana.

-- Nathan, Middlebury, In. www.knfurniture.blogspot.com

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