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Topic by Hermando posted 06-11-2013 08:40 AM 2757 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hermando

3 posts in 1716 days

06-11-2013 08:40 AM

Hello, I am new to the site, but have recently wanted to fill an unused space in my yard that is a bit of an eyesore and in need of something greener in terms of a garden. The area has full sunlight all day. The problem I have is the area was an old tennis court and has been a challenge to remove the mass amounts of asphalt, which at this point works as weed control.

My question is can I build raised garden bed fames directly onto the asphalt surface maybe 12-24” high and fill with the necessary ingredients for planting or would I be better off removing the asphalt to the dirt or incorporate a drainage bottom to the beds ( I was thinking of cedar bottoms.

The easier and cost effective way would be to just build a frame over the asphalt. Also is mid June/early July to late for a garden.

Thanks so much for any advice.
H.



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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

06-11-2013 01:08 PM

I don’t know the right answer but I would build it right on top. I would put some gravel or something as a transition from asphalt to soil.
That way if you change your mind after you still have the weed control asphalt intact.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Hermando

3 posts in 1716 days

06-11-2013 01:24 PM

Debbie thank you for your input, I think its a great idea without having to do so much prep work by removing asphalt and then I can begin a late season grow with some fresh soil withing the garden boxes.

View jroot's profile

jroot

5121 posts in 3506 days
hardiness zone 5a

06-12-2013 05:28 AM

IF you are not removing the asphalt, I would line it with a plastic liner to try to prevent any contamination from the asphalt coming up. You are surely aware that asphalt has a good percentage of oil in it. If this were to leach up, it would not bode well for your plants. Make sure that you have good drainage though, so the gravel on top of the plastic would be good, as long as you have an escape for the water as well.

Experiment, and see what happens.

... just my two cents worth …

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

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Hermando

3 posts in 1716 days

06-12-2013 07:45 AM

I did some research on these types of vegetable garden boxes and it is becoming very popular in urban settings where gardens are being grown on vacant parking lots. There is not alot of information of how to do the layering of the soil, mulch and drainage to protect from contamination. JRoot I think you gave me the best advice so far because I would have over looked the negative effects of what I envisioned.

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JamesHou

4 posts in 1652 days

08-15-2013 07:28 AM

Hi, you do need insulate asphalt with your bed. Poison in asphalt can permeate into soil grandully and this is not good for vegetables. You can put some gravel above asphalt first and then put some wooden boards, plywood or others on gravel. By this you bed soil will have good drainage and ventillation.
I came across a web shows some interesting raised garden beds, maybe you can have a look.
http://www.huayi-wood.com/wooden-planting-tables.html

-- http://www.grandwills.com

View arunmarvel7's profile

arunmarvel7

3 posts in 1518 days

01-11-2014 03:09 AM

For raising garden beds you can use old or existing wood “Pallets” You can get this from many industries as a scavenging material.

(edited to remove link)

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kindman

29 posts in 1429 days
hardiness zone 7a

03-25-2014 03:51 PM

It has been about 5 years since I built my raised beds for my vegetable garden. I would like to add as a “project” if allowed.

-- Kindman in Rhode Island

View jroot's profile

jroot

5121 posts in 3506 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-25-2014 04:04 PM

Definitely allowed. I would love to see how you did yours. I might get a some good ideas from you. :)

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

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kindman

29 posts in 1429 days
hardiness zone 7a

03-26-2014 05:01 AM

I tried to set up a “Project” but got this:You cannot post a new project until your first post has been reviewed and approved.

I will wait and see…

-- Kindman in Rhode Island

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kindman

29 posts in 1429 days
hardiness zone 7a

04-15-2014 02:54 PM

SO…. are there actually administrators for this site… or are they robots?
I replied to “Cricket” and asked about the ability to post…. NO REPLY!

I posted THREE WEEKS ago and STILL,,, I am not approved to post a new Blog or Project.

Helllloooooo?

-- Kindman in Rhode Island

View jroot's profile

jroot

5121 posts in 3506 days
hardiness zone 5a

04-15-2014 03:04 PM

I have sent a note to Cricket to see what the process is, kindman. Here is what I said to her.

It appears that kindman has been trying to post a project on this site, but has been unsuccessful.

What is the process that he has to go through in order to successful make his postings? Your response would be most appreciated.

John

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

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jroot

5121 posts in 3506 days
hardiness zone 5a

04-15-2014 05:48 PM

Cricket just assured me that you should be able to post your projects now, Kindman.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View jamesdshort's profile

jamesdshort

1 post in 1404 days

04-19-2014 10:57 PM

I am also doing a raised bed, but not on top of asphalt. How deep should these boxes be? I’m on a city lot here in the Philippines. All I’d like to do is grow some tomatoes, peppers, etc.

Thanks for any input!

View jroot's profile

jroot

5121 posts in 3506 days
hardiness zone 5a

04-20-2014 08:47 AM

If you can get 2 inch x 10 inch for your box sides, that would be good. Obviously, the deeper the better.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View Greenthumb's profile

Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3696 days

04-22-2014 07:48 PM

time

is a gardens friend

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

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Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3696 days

04-22-2014 07:53 PM

i like a 12” depth

i grow potatos in 20” deep buckets

much depends on how u fertilize your plants, vs, how much room they need to grow without it

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

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Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3696 days

04-22-2014 07:55 PM

nice thing about owning the soil, to which we grow plants

if the seed sits in the soil, warmed by the sun

vs, sits in pot, warmed by your soul

the sun most often wins

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

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Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3696 days

04-22-2014 08:08 PM

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

View Greenthumb's profile

Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3696 days

04-22-2014 08:11 PM

the spoils of planting a failure

never reach the point of where disappointment surpasses trying to get a meal from the soil, thats free

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

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Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3696 days

04-26-2014 07:02 PM

of course you can

google ” community gardens ” in “urban” areas

type the same into the search engines of sites like “ Pinterest “ and “Houzz”,

sometimes our worst fears, turn out to be the our best friends : )

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

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