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Topic by MsDebbieP posted 06-09-2013 12:49 PM 641 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsDebbieP

14684 posts in 2689 days
hardiness zone 5b

06-09-2013 12:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cup plant silphium perfoliatum edible

June 9/13

I guess this is why this plant is called a “cup plant”. (Silphium perfoliatum).

It’s a huge plant … we’ll see what it looks like when in flower.

The cup plant is native to the region. It can gro up to 8’ tall—- I don’t think I put it in the right place!

And this info is from Wikipedia .. “edible” you say???

QUOTE
S. perfoliatum is considered to have a high feed value for meat and milk producing farm animals because of its longevity and high protein levels. [5]

The plant produces a resin that has an odor similar to turpentine.[13] The plant contains a gum and resin; the root has been used medicinally.[2] The resin has been made into chewing gum to prevent nausea and vomiting.[4] Native Americans would cut off the top of the plant stalk and collect the resinous sap that was emitted from the plant. The resin was used for a chewing gum to freshen breath. The Winnebagos Tribe believed that a potion made from the rhizome would provide supernatural powers. The people belonging to the tribe would drink this potion before hunting.[4] The people of the Chippewas tribe used the root extract for back and chest pains, to prevent excessive menstruation, and to treat lung hemorrhage.[14] During the spring, the tender young leaves were cultivated as an acceptable food source by cooking or a salad.[4]

The powdered form of Silphium perfoliatum L. has diaphoretic and tonic properties. It can help alleviate the symptoms of fevers, dry cough, asthma, spleen illness, heart and liver disease. The extract from the leaves of the plant has shown to lower cholesterol and triglycerides levels in blood. Studies show that the presence of phenolic acids is responsible for the species’ antiseptic activity to stimulate generation of IgG and IgM antibodies. In addition, it stimulates bile production of the gall bladder.[15]

Silphium perfoliatum contains amino acids, carbohydrates (inulinin rhizomes), L-ascorbic acid, terpenes with essential oils, triterpene saponins, carotenoids, phenolic acid, tannins, and flavonoids.[13]

The long blossoming season and abundance of flowers provides a rich source for bees and the cultivation of honey.[5]

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)



View Karson's profile

Karson

242 posts in 2568 days

06-09-2013 01:59 PM

Very nice Debbie. So you get to grow your own chewing gun, which may or may not taste like Turpentine.

-- Karson retired in DE e-mail karson_morrison@bigfoot.com

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14684 posts in 2689 days
hardiness zone 5b

06-09-2013 05:04 PM

haha exactly!!!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Horsetail's profile

Horsetail

38 posts in 2146 days
hardiness zone 6b

06-10-2013 01:41 PM

I love reading about all the uses that plants can be put to.Is this also called False SUnflower?

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14684 posts in 2689 days
hardiness zone 5b

06-10-2013 02:50 PM

I don’t think so…. the leaves are different.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4305 posts in 1952 days
hardiness zone 5b

06-10-2013 08:14 PM

Out Teasel plant has the same cup formation where the leaves come out of the stem. I don’t think I ever want any chewing gum you make from that plant, Debbie. : D

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14684 posts in 2689 days
hardiness zone 5b

06-10-2013 08:33 PM

ah come on …. you, Robin??? Not willing to give something a try? I can’t believe it!!! :D

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4305 posts in 1952 days
hardiness zone 5b

06-10-2013 08:35 PM

It was the idea that it tasted like turpentine…. : D

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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MsDebbieP

14684 posts in 2689 days
hardiness zone 5b

06-10-2013 08:38 PM

hehe I know… can’t imagine you’d want to put that in your mouth if turpentine was the smell and then flavour. ewww

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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