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Plant Info: Persimmon

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Topic by MsDebbieP posted 05-08-2012 06:13 AM 4272 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-08-2012 06:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: persimmon

This is a GATEWAY to everything posted at GardenTenders.com tagged as “Persimmon”

Feel free to add any info (technical or practical) here as well.

 

-PLANT INFO MASTER LIST http://gardentenders.com/topics/1678

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)



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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-08-2012 06:15 AM

Eric Toensmeier says that a persimmon tree is one of the top five plants for a yard. Read his interview here

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-08-2012 06:42 AM

I just received my (2) persimmon trees and now need to determine where they will go. I had forgotten that I was receiving “2”. So now I am doing some research:

  • a Carolinian Forest tree
  • fruit are edible (some say best after the first good frost; others pick them before ready and let them ripen in the house
  • American Persimmons – inedible until completely ripe (high in tannin I do believe)
  • “The astringency of tannins is removed through ripening by exposure to light over several days, wrapping the fruit in paper (probably because this increases the ethylene concentration of the surrounding air), and/or artificially with chemicals such as alcohol and carbon dioxide which change tannin into the insoluble form. This bletting process is sometimes jumpstarted by exposing the fruit to cold or frost which quickens cellular wall breakdown. These astringent persimmons can also be prepared for commercial purposes by drying.” (Wiki) (Also check out the site re: eating unripened fruit—not good!)
  • one of the last trees to get their leaves/blossoms – avoiding late frosts. Nice.
  • seeds can be roasted and used as coffee
  • “spiced fruit bread is popular. Any astringency remaining in the fruit whilst cooking can be removed by adding a half teaspoon of baking soda for each cup of pulp. Cast iron utensils should not be used as the pulp will turn black. Persimmon bread is simply made by adding the pulp to the flour/yeast mix.” (source)
The Tree
  • hardy to -25C
  • it might have fruit by age 8
  • grows fast in the first 8 years (before fruiting)
  • can grow to 100’ but typically are 45’
  • flowers are on one-year-old branches
  • has a very deep tap root
  • “These trees are ideal for interplanting because of their deep roots allowing more shallow rooting trees to be planted nearby.” (source)
  • need full sun but can tolerate some shade
  • space the trees 25’ apart
  • they sucker heavily and need pruning to maintain it’s shape
  • they can be “espaliered”

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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mmh

332 posts in 3405 days
hardiness zone 7a

05-08-2012 11:45 AM

The Japanese (flat/round) persimmon can be eaten when hard and crisp because they do not have the problem with astringency. I don’t think these are as hardy, so some research is needed for your area.

The fruit can not only be eaten while crisp, but also ripe/soft and they are also press and dried to preserve and can be eaten as a confection.

-- A weed is a plant that is growing where it was not purposefully placed by human hands.

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-08-2012 11:48 AM

thanks M.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3139 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-08-2012 12:36 PM

I can attest to the fact that persimmon trees are late to leaf out. My persimmons are just starting to show leaves now, after all the apples and cherries are almost finished blooming. I have had mixed results with my trees. The one I planted highest on the hill has grown the most slowly. I think the place is too hot and dry for it. It is alive, but I wouldn’t call it thriving. The ones I planted lower down the hill are doing much better. This will be their third year but they were very small when I put them in the ground. Most of mine are growing like a tree, but one seems to want to be a bush and i don’t mind a bit. Good luck with your persimmon trees and Sea Buckthorn bushes! When it stops raining, I will take a photo to share.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-08-2012 01:28 PM

thanks for the info and “good luck”.
I have put them in pots for now and have given them a nice drink of water after their long trip.
Now they will be fine until I decide where to put them. I hope.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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chscholz

156 posts in 2759 days
hardiness zone 8

05-08-2012 01:35 PM

I’d love to get one, specifically looking for a Texas persimmon as an ornamental tree. Unfortunately all persimmones I have seen in the local nurseries are grafted.

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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3139 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-26-2012 05:59 AM

As promised, here are photos of some of my persimmon trees. They were very small when I purchased them from Henry Fields and now they have been in the ground for two years.

This one is doing the best. I am encouraging it to be a bush rather than a tree because of its close proximity to other plants that also need sun.

This is the tree I planted higher up the hill where it is hotter and drier. After two years, it is still only a foot tall. What a difference the location can make!

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-26-2012 06:04 AM

oh wow!! What a difference.
Mine are just “sticks”. No leaves. (I just got them this spring).

Are you going to prune them for “high density landscaping”?

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3139 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-26-2012 06:31 AM

Some of them I will allow to grow large but the bush shaped one I would like to keep smaller. My gardens are constantly evolving as I learn and grow. Right now I think I am somewhere between growing an “edible food forest” and engaging in “high density edible landscaping”. I don’t think they are that different, actually, except perhaps how high I chose to let the the top canopy be.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-26-2012 06:47 AM

I’m on the same line of thinking as you.
I’d like my Carolinian Trees to grow full-size but my edibles, I’d like to have them accessible when I’m 90 so that means compact trees.

The “high density” video has really opened up the gardening ideas for me. So many new places that I can put fruit trees and the trees I have the greater the chance that I’ll get something to survive the late spring frosts. (This year, out of all of our fruit trees, we have only one plum producing fruit.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3139 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-26-2012 07:22 AM

I wish that the winter/spring had not been so hard on your fruit trees, but at least you still have bushes that have berries, right? honeyberries, nannyberries, blueberries, strawberries…. I was so worried about our fruit trees for the same reason but the apples appear to be doing well and we also have a few cherries too because our cherry tree blooms fairly late. No sign of any peaches or apricots, but perhaps they are still too young to bear.

I like the idea of planting many different types of fruits and nuts and also varieties that develop early, medium and late in the season to increase our chances of getting fruit despite the challenges the weather throws at us each year.

Now I am imagining you biting into a juicy, ripe plum, still warm from the sun. : )

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-26-2012 11:43 AM

yes… we are eating our handful of haskap/honeyberries (kind of fun!), we’ll have some strawberries, lots of blueberries, nannyberries, saskatoon berries and grapes … lots of grapes.
Can’t wait to have another plum – the one I had two years ago was SOOOO delicious!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-28-2012 12:45 PM

some info here

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3139 days
hardiness zone 5b

07-02-2014 06:26 AM

We have our first persimmon fruit! I noticed that two of our five American Persimmon trees were blooming two weeks ago. I knew that we needed a male and a female tree for fruit, so I did some investigation. Yes! One tree is a male and one is a female! I can tell because the flowers, although similar, are attached differently to the branch of the tree. Male flowers tend to have a longer stem and often come in clusters. Female flowers are more attached to the branch – makes sense considering the blooms will turn into heavy fruit – and grow alone on the branch. Just the other day I checked again and I saw fruit starting to form in the pollinated blooms. The fruit are still tiny, and I am not skilled at taking close-up photos, but here are pictures of the two trees. I planted them four seasons ago when they were no taller than 12 – 18 inches. The trees are about 150 – 200 feet apart and can be pollinated by both insects and wind.

The female tree: (The tree is in front of the corner of the barn/Chuck’s wood-shop.)

Incidentally, this is the same tree as the first persimmon photo I posted in this thread two years ago. Hasn’t it grown?

The male tree:

Our family likes the taste of Asian Persimmons that we have purchased from the grocery store and we are looking forward to trying our first home-grown American Persimmon this autumn.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

07-02-2014 09:37 AM

awesome!
I have one persimmon tree .. still need to get my second one but now I’m thinking that I will wait until this one flowers, and then go to the nursery and buy a second one (when they are in flower) and pick one with the “opposite” pattern!
Thanks for the research!
Your trees look fantastic.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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ankushabcd

1 post in 1259 days

09-11-2014 04:53 AM

Hey, I am ankush. nice post.

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