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Topic by MsDebbieP posted 03-21-2011 11:55 AM 3367 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

03-21-2011 11:55 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plant info gateway asparagus

This is a GATEWAY to everything at GardenTenders.com tagged as “ASPARAGUS”

Please add any tips (technical or practical) re: asparagus here.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)



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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

03-21-2011 11:59 AM

GROUNDCOVER: According to what I’ve read: asparagus doesn’t like to fight with other plants for space so it can send its new shoots up. Therefore, no ground cover and just mulch to keep the weeds down.
- suggestion: plant a vine vegetable outside the area and let the vine intertwine with the asparagus, creating a “mulch” but not competing with the roots.

COMPANION PLANTS: Tomato, Parsley, Basil, Marigolds (beetles), Asters, dill, comfrey
(NOT onions)

SOIL: sandy soil; ph7

HARVEST: mid-spring

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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jroot

5121 posts in 3506 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-21-2011 04:01 PM

A relative sent me this article the other day. I am not sure about its validity, but when I saw your link to asparagus, I thought I’d throw it out there for someone to research further. I’d be curious to know what others think about it.

Subject: Asparagus – Who Knew???

Have never seen a clinical study that supports the antecdotal case histories outined here but who knows maybe there maybe some truth to the stories.

Asparagus—Who knew ?
From a friend –
My Mom had been taking the full-stalk canned style asparagus that she pureed and she took 4 tablespoons in
the morning and 4 tablespoons later in the day. She did this for over a month. She is on chemo pills for Stage 3 lung cancer in the pleural area and her cancer cell count went from 386 down to 125 as of this past week.
Her oncologist said she does not need to see him for 3 months.

THE ARTICLE:
Several years ago, I had a man seeking asparagus for a friend who had cancer. He gave me a photocopied copy of an article, entitled, Asparagus for cancer ‘printed in Cancer News Journal, December 1979. I will share it here, just as it was shared with me: I am a biochemist, and have specialized in the relation of diet to health or over 50 years. Several years ago, I learned of the discovery of Richard R. Vensal, D.D.S. that asparagus might cure cancer. Since then, I have worked with him on his project We have accumulated a number
of favorable case histories. Here are a few examples:

Case No. 1, A man with an almost hopeless case of Hodgkin’s disease (cancer of the lymph glands) who was completely incapacitated. Within 1 year of starting the asparagus therapy, his doctors were unable to detect any signs of cancer, and he was back on a schedule of strenuous exercise.

Case No. 2, a successful businessman 68 years old who suffered from cancer of the bladder for 16 years. After years of medical treatments, including radiation without improvement, he went on asparagus. Within 3 months, examinations revealed that his bladder tumor had disappeared and that his kidneys were normal.

Case No. 3, a man who had lung cancer. On March 5th 1971, he was put on the operating table where they found lung cancer so widely spread that it was inoperable. The surgeon sewed him up and declared his case
hopeless. On April 5th he heard about the Asparagus therapy and immediately started taking it By August,
x-ray pictures revealed that all signs of the cancer had disappeared.. He is back at his regular business routine.

Case No. 4, a woman who was troubled for a number of years with skin cancer. She finally developed different
skin cancers which were diagnosed by the acting specialist as advanced. Within 3 months after starting on asparagus, her skin specialist said that her skin looked fine and no more skin lesions. This woman reported that the asparagus therapy also cured her kidney disease, which started in 1949. She had over 10 operations for kidney stones, and was receiving government disability payments for an inoperable, terminal, kidney condition. She attributes the cure of this kidney trouble entirely to the asparagus.

I was not surprised at this result, as `The elements of materia medica’, edited in1854 by a Professor at the
University of Pennsylvania , stated that asparagus was used as a popular remedy for kidney stones. He even
referred to experiments, in 1739, on the power of asparagus in dissolving stones. Note the dates! We would have other case histories but the medical establishment has interfered with our obtaining some of the records. I am therefore appealing to readers to spread this good news and help us to gather a large number of case histories that will overwhelm the medical skeptics about this unbelievably simple and natural remedy.

For the treatment, asparagus should be cooked before using, and therefore canned asparagus is just as good as fresh. I have corresponded with the two leading canners of asparagus, Giant and Stokely, and I am satisfied that these brands contain no pesticides or preservatives. Place the cooked asparagus in a blender and liquefy to make a puree, and store in the refrigerator. Give the patient 4 full tablespoons twice daily, morning and
evening. Patients usually show some improvement in 2-4 weeks. It can be diluted with water and used as a
cold or hot drink. This suggested dosage is based on present experience, but certainly larger amounts can do
no harm and may be needed in some cases. As a biochemist I am convinced of the old saying that `what cures can prevent.’ Based on this theory, my wife and I have been using asparagus puree as a beverage with
our meals. We take 2 tablespoons diluted in water to suit our taste with breakfast and with dinner. I take
mine hot and my wife prefers hers cold. For years we have made it a practice to have blood surveys taken as
part of our regular checkups. The last blood survey, taken by a medical doctor who specializes in the nutritional approach to health, showed substantial improvements in all categories over the last one, and we can attribute these improvements to nothing but the asparagus drink.
As a biochemist, I have made an extensive study of all aspects of cancer, and all of the proposed cures. As a
result, I am convinced that asparagus fits in better with the latest theories about cancer.

Asparagus contains a good supply of protein called histones, which are believed to be active in controlling cell growth.. For that reason, I believe asparagus can be said to contain a substance that I call cell growth normalizer. That accounts for its action on cancer and in acting as a general body tonic. In any event, regardless of theory, asparagus used as we suggest, is a harmless substance. The FDA cannot prevent you
from using it and it may do you much good. It has been reported by the US National Cancer Institute, that
asparagus is the highest tested food containing glutathione, which is considered one of the body’s most potent anticarcinogens and antioxidants.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

03-21-2011 04:27 PM

well isn’t that interesting

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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sharad

1671 posts in 3093 days
hardiness zone 11

03-22-2011 12:56 PM

Shatavari the Indian name for Asparagus is the most important herb in Ayurvedic medicine for women. In India, Shatavari is considered the women’s equivalent to Ashwagandha(Indian Ginseng, Shown to increase semen quality ) The name translates to “she who possesses 100 husbands”, referring to the herbs rejuvanitive effect upon the female reproductive organs.
The healing qualities of Shatavari are useful to a wide array of ailments. It is also effective in a number of other systems of the body and is therefore of use to both men and women. In Australia the herb is more often used to treat gastrointestinal disorders and as an external wash for wounds. (Ref:Ayurved for you)

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

03-22-2011 01:44 PM

bring on the Asparagus!!!
Sharad, you are a WEALTH of information.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Bon

7374 posts in 3656 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-23-2011 09:27 AM

Wow and to think I pulled up all kinds of asparagus plants and got rid of them when I moved here.I wanted more room for flowers. Who would have thought it was that good for you.
Thanks to Jroot and Sharad for alll that information.

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

03-23-2011 09:33 AM

asparagus makes such a lovely background plant for flowers – even if you don’t eat it.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Gone_Tropical

510 posts in 2589 days
hardiness zone 9b

03-23-2011 01:45 PM

so we are talking about the vegetable, not the asparagus fern, yes?

this is one of the asparagus ferns (Asparagus densiflorus ‘Myersii’):

-- Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ Gone Tropical Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ

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jroot

5121 posts in 3506 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-23-2011 03:46 PM

The vegetable for sure. Nice fern, though.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-18-2011 01:32 PM

5/18/11

We’re having a cool/wet spring this year but it hasn’t stopped the asparagus from growing – thank goodness. It is a glorious sight, to be sure, as everything else is delayed.

Well, not everything else—the weeds are doing fine. Today, in between misty rain periods, I went out to tackle the weeds around the asparagus. Based on the information posted above, I don’t want anything to compete with its root systems and I haven’t gotten any mulch yet to spread between the rows. And so I went pull the little weed-seedlings from the ground.

As I pulled weeds, the thought of ”polyculture” kept jumping into my mind and I thought that there must be a natural environment for asparagus that enhances its grown. When I was almost done the weeding, I came to the last clump of asparagus – the healthiest looking spears. They were large and they were spread out a bit giving lots of room for growth. Was this just a luck of the draw, the best original roots that I’d planted? Or – was it the great big dandelion that was growing in the middle?

I’m going to bet on the dandelion. It stayed where it was and I’m hoping for more to pop up. Perhaps I’ll be looking for dandelion seeds and planting them in amongst the asparagus clumps on purpose! My neighbours will thank me, don’t you think?

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-18-2011 01:35 PM

I was looking for polyculture companion plants for asparagus and I found this tidbit of information: The roots of asparagus will be 10 feet deep in a few years. 10 feet deep!! I don’t know what could be competing with those roots! Wow.

and then there is from an Asparagus Growers Newsletter: While these deep roots do extract water, the most active zone of water and nutrient uptake occurs in the top 2ft.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-18-2011 01:50 PM

How To Harvest
- snap off the shoots (the tender part will separate from the woody base)
- cut the remainder of the shoot off at/below the soil line.

and for the ferns:
-do not cut back the asparagus foliage while it is still green; the asparagus plants must manufacture and store adequate levels of food in their roots and crowns. The dead (brown) tops can be cut back in late fall but it is recommended that the dead top growth be allowed to stand over winter, to collect snow and protect the crown.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Aileen Edword

121 posts in 2494 days

05-20-2011 03:26 AM

I love Asparagus It adds such laash green to ypur garden. Asparagus makes such a lovely background as specialy for flower plants in flower gardens. It is always adviseble to plant such greens in your garden.

-- http://www.mightygarden.com/flower-gardening.html

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-28-2012 12:45 PM

some info here

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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jroot

5121 posts in 3506 days
hardiness zone 5a

05-28-2012 01:52 PM

Last month, I saw there was a nice lady who planned to put an addition to their workshop exactly where there was an 35 year old asparagus bed. She was selling the plants, so I filled two pails with asparagus clumps, got them planted and lucky for me they all took. As an added bonus, there were strawberry plants mixed in with the asparagus plants, so I got them too. They all took. Now, they have risen up, and I am letting them go to leaf for the first year, and possibly next year too. Then I’ll have my fill of fresh asparagus on a regular basis.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-28-2012 02:24 PM

that’s awesome!
We have had so much asparagus this year that I can’t keep up with it :D

We found that we didn’t like it dehydrated or frozen really (at least my efforts at it) ... so.. I shredded the extra and dehydrated it and this winter I will use it as you would dried parsley and add it to potatoes etc. We get the goodness of the asparagus without the questionable texture of the preserved produce.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

12-29-2012 02:25 AM

good info here—> LINK

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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