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Topic by MsDebbieP posted 08-24-2010 08:53 AM 3631 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

08-24-2010 08:53 AM

Topic tags/keywords: forest garden edible forest

(August 24/10)
I found this PDF file/website on how much food a forest garden can produce.

EDITED

This is a GATEWAY to everything posted at GardenTenders.com tagged as “forest gardens”

Feel free to add any info (technical or practical) here as well.

 

-PLANT INFO MASTER LIST http://gardentenders.com/topics/1678

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)



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Vallyncia

84 posts in 2748 days
hardiness zone 8

08-24-2010 11:07 AM

Thanks for sharing Debbie! This is great informatoin and could be even be used on a larger scale, in city parks and community gardens for production in areas that are generally left for “decorative purposes”. Also, so many of the foods are delicious and grow on such beautiful plants :)

-- Gardens are a form of autobiography. ~Sydney Eddison

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

08-24-2010 11:22 AM

a good point re: gardens/parks.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have a “forest garden” as a park? As long as the people who like to sue don’t visit – I’m sure they would find lots of reasons to complain. But back to the positive note – we have lots of spaces in our communities that could grow produce. I like the idea!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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mmh

332 posts in 3401 days
hardiness zone 7a

08-24-2010 11:23 AM

Interesting info.

When I planned my garden I had 10 fruit trees around the perimeter of my 1/4 acre yard and numerous beds of edibles and ornamentals. I have lost a few of the fruit trees and replaced with hardier ones, but the main problem is the population of squirrels who reak havoc by biting off green apples and disguarding them afterwards, letting them rot on the ground. They also eat the pits of the green apricots before the fruit ripens. I have two paw paw trees and don’t think I’ll see any ripe fruit, but it’s still early, maybe next year. I do however get blueberries if I’m up earlier than the catbird and right now the figs are ripening and if I’m quick I beat the birds and the ants.

-- A weed is a plant that is growing where it was not purposefully placed by human hands.

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

08-24-2010 12:00 PM

when our trees start producing in quantity, they will be getting nets put over them. The birds can peck at the outside layer and we’ll get the rest—that’s the theory, anyway.

Rick had an apricot at his house and the squirrels did that.. toss the fruit, take the pit.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Iris43

3811 posts in 3502 days
hardiness zone 5a

08-24-2010 04:35 PM

MsDeb, did you see a program on TVO a couple evenings ago re. permaculture? It was so interesting. I know some of our GT’s have talked about this subject bf, but perhaps I didn’t fully understand what they were talking about. This program explained permaculture so it made perfect sense. My father must have understood this as I recognized so much of how he gardened and reaped the harvest of the fields and forests. The program I watched originated in England, I think.

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3135 days
hardiness zone 5b

08-24-2010 04:56 PM

Thanks for the link, Debbie. I have planted eighteen of the plants listed, as well as some others I would add to that list. : ) Like you, I will be adding more!

I think it is very timely that we begin to think about and act accordingly on the realization that our current lifestyle is not sustainable. I was reading Scientific American magazine today and I came across an article with a visionary focus about the next revolution in farming by John Reganold. As many permaculture advocates, he believes and bases his actions on the fact that the planet will not be able to produce enough food for the estimated nine billion people who will populate this world by the midcentury without causing “irreparable damage to the environment” if we continue to engage in conventional farming practices.

He suggests that we have to switch from resource-intensive practices to knowledge-intensive practices in order to sustainably provide food for all and still have a healthy environment. I think the food forest fits into the category of knowledge-intensive practices perfectly. John Reganold is a soil scientist and a proponent of organic farming methods. Many of his examples dealt with healing the soil, including switching to no-till farming, crop rotation and leaving residual vegetation on the soil after harvesting. Another important suggestion was to eliminate waste. Very thought provoking and it probably reached a large audience.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

08-24-2010 05:03 PM

yes, I saw that last year (or earlier this year) and then watched the end of it again the other night.
After watching it Rick understood all the things that I have been talking to him about re: gardening.

It is a very good program!
I found info on it online.. but I can’t find it now, of course

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

08-24-2010 05:06 PM

on the show …if I get this right, an acre of land, currently, will feed 5 people.. an acre of forest garden will feed 10 people or 25,, I should have written it down.

We have to switch from grains to nuts as our main “filler” food… grains are horrible consumers of space and energy requirements.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

08-24-2010 05:08 PM

oh and reducing the amount of meat that we eat – smaller portions, less frequently.

We have to have a lifestyle change, a drastic change.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-04-2011 06:44 PM

here’s a good video: http://www.localsustainability.net/2011/04/martin-crawfords-forest-garden-video/

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

05-05-2012 02:53 PM

here is a FANTASTIC video discussing edible forest gardening

Thank-you Alys Fowler.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

01-06-2013 07:57 AM

I found this list today: Wild edible plants of Ontario Canada.
Only plants that cannot be confused with a toxic species has been included

LINK

and their edible berries list
and the edible mushrooms list

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3873 days
hardiness zone 5b

08-06-2013 05:06 PM

a list of free books re: edible landscaping http://jubilee101.com/subscription/edible-landscaping-books/

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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