GardenTenders

Millstone Fountains

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Garden Spaces and Projects forum

Topic by QueenBee posted 03-07-2008 01:18 AM 11004 views 1 time favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View QueenBee's profile

QueenBee

10 posts in 2559 days

03-07-2008 01:18 AM

I have always loved the look of millstone fountains, but the cost of a millstone keeps the idea an impossible dream. I just ran across an faux millstone on the Internet, and was wondering if anyone has an experience with them. How real do they look?

-- -- Aleece, Central Texas



View Jason's profile

Jason

840 posts in 2544 days
hardiness zone 5

03-07-2008 05:04 AM

How’s the pic look? Have you a link we can check?

-- Living on the square...Metro Detroit

View Eklectic's profile

Eklectic

1824 posts in 2491 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-07-2008 05:21 AM

Have you tried making it yourself with hypertufa? Concrete mix)

-- Eklectic, Follow my Bliss, South East Ontario 5a

View Jason's profile

Jason

840 posts in 2544 days
hardiness zone 5

03-07-2008 05:22 AM

Good idea…you can make it the exact size you want!

-- Living on the square...Metro Detroit

View QueenBee's profile

QueenBee

10 posts in 2559 days

03-07-2008 06:43 AM

Here is a link to the faux version.

http://www.aquasupercenter.com/SearchResult.aspx?KeyWords=fountain

I have a vague idea of what hypertufa is. Can you tell me more about it? Is it an exercise in patience (something I am only just learning)? Any ideas on what I could use as a form?

Thanks for your help!

-- -- Aleece, Central Texas

View Jason's profile

Jason

840 posts in 2544 days
hardiness zone 5

03-07-2008 02:01 PM

Cool design! If you’re handy in the shop at all, you can certainly build a form out of plywood. You can use flex-ply for the border (curves). Something like that could be put together for way under $100 (concrete included).

-- Living on the square...Metro Detroit

View Catspaw's profile

Catspaw

244 posts in 2487 days

03-09-2008 03:32 PM

O.K., so I went and checked out hypertufa. Never heard of it before. But, then, I’ve never been one for lawn stuff, (gnomes, statues, flower pots, etc.) Now that I know what it is, I can act like I know everything without ever having stayed at a Holiday Inn express.

Hypertufa would not be as good for a fountain as would full concrete. Hypertufa is designed to be porous like the limestone it’s emmulating. For a fountain, you would want a sealed surface. The water should flow on the surface as opposed to soaking in (although I don’t believe it would get sucked up like a sponge or anything.)

This is a definite DIY. The beauty of concrete is that it shapes up however you want. Since it is supposed to be natural looking, it certainly doesn’t have to be perfect.

Plywood forms would be fine. Covered in chicken wire or metal lathe stapled to the outside. Rebar covered with lathe. Lots of ways of doing the form. Just pre-plan the pump stuff so you don’t have to cut holes in the concrete.

If I were doing one, I would use rebar because it can be bent so easily. But, I would also be welding it together. Plywood form would eventually rot out unless you use treated. But it’s easier to have the tools to do wood.

I was trying to think of a form you could use like a kiddie pool or something. But, I can’t think of one that would have the square edges.

Just making a round form, then, parging the outside, sculpted to the surface you want shouldn’t take alot of patience. The first couple of coats for the build-up would be quick and easy. The last one is where you’d need to bring out your crafty side. But, it would be fun, too, because it would be free-hand.

I disagree with D. I think it will cost you almost $100 (this includes the pump…and plywood is getting expensive.) All seriousness aside…..good thing is you can buy bits of material at a time. Biggest single outlays would be the sheet of plywood and the pump.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist......Zone out....(USA 5)

View Eklectic's profile

Eklectic

1824 posts in 2491 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-09-2008 04:22 PM

Actually, hypertufa would be nice for a fountain. I have made some pieces that have been outside for 3 years now all weather. As well, once it’s completely cured, you can seal. These two bases are made with it. it!

The first one I used concrete stain and the second one is plain hypertufa.

As far as mold, you can use an plastic dish bowl, and old pot (second hand stores).

The difference with the “plain” concrete is you can pour it while the hypertufa you have to “mold it”.
If you are really interested, I will try to help you, but I will be away for about one week. Just let me know!

-- Eklectic, Follow my Bliss, South East Ontario 5a

View Jason's profile

Jason

840 posts in 2544 days
hardiness zone 5

03-09-2008 11:18 PM

Catspaw, I never though of rebar, which would certainly add to the cost, and the pump. And heck, since most of us are also Lumberjocks, I naturally assumed that we all have sheets of plywood in our shops, for just such a project. :-)

-- Living on the square...Metro Detroit

View Eklectic's profile

Eklectic

1824 posts in 2491 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-09-2008 11:41 PM

Re bar is not expensive and you can use hardware cloth with a reinforcer.
_*YOU do not need plywood!
A mold can be made of anything you want to use!!

-- Eklectic, Follow my Bliss, South East Ontario 5a

View QueenBee's profile

QueenBee

10 posts in 2559 days

03-09-2008 11:48 PM

I’m not a lumberjock, but my husband is, so plywood and crazy misc. materials are always at hand.

I ran into this link while search for Hypertufa info. I went ahead and bought the book, because I thought the copper tubing chandelier was also interesting.

http://books.google.com/books?id=u4vF5j9ZXYoC&pg=PA20&lpg=PA20&dq=hypertufa+millstone&source=web&ots=4qopLRq8gb&sig=pgyV48WLtOZGAb9JjmkraWsqNF8&hl=en#PPA20,M1

-- -- Aleece, Central Texas

View Eklectic's profile

Eklectic

1824 posts in 2491 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-10-2008 12:14 AM

I know the book! I also want to buy it!
Good luck with your Millstone Fountain.
If you need info, I can maybe help.!

-- Eklectic, Follow my Bliss, South East Ontario 5a

View Eklectic's profile

Eklectic

1824 posts in 2491 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-10-2008 12:17 AM

I know the book! I also want to buy it!
Good luck with your Millstone Fountain.
If you need info, I can maybe help.!

-- Eklectic, Follow my Bliss, South East Ontario 5a

View Greenthumb's profile

Greenthumb

2290 posts in 2511 days

03-10-2008 02:33 PM

A few years back and periodically through life I have been fortunate to be employed by an architectural concrete company. The company made every thing from 20’ fluted columns to clam shell ceilings. By far, it was the most challenging woodworking projects to date. The company shipped their product through out Canada, the USA and the Carribean.

basic forms are easily made with plywood and epoxy resin. I rather doubt that in just a few short paragraphs, that I could explain what took 30 years to learn so might I suggest buying a “kit”. Lee Valley used to sell the molds and I suspect many other places do to.

Re-bar is cheap, so is steel grid but keep in mind that any steel, that isnt buried 3 1/2” deep into the concrete will bleed rust through the surface if exposed to moisture or water.

As for colouring the concrete…just two options of many …...dye available at most landscaping outlets, and or coloured sand. A spray of muriatic acid will etch the surface making it look like stone but dont forget to thoroughly rinse the acid off with water because the acid doesnt know when to stop etching.

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

View Catspaw's profile

Catspaw

244 posts in 2487 days

03-11-2008 12:35 AM

I went and took another look at the link and discovered the fountain shown was really little. I figure a little chicken wire and maybe something underneath (wire tie a piece of cardboard underneath) to keep from pushing stuff excessively through top would suffice.

I say go get yer hands dirty and make yourself a big mud pie.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist......Zone out....(USA 5)

View QueenBee's profile

QueenBee

10 posts in 2559 days

03-11-2008 01:02 AM

After reading all of your very helpful posts, I have a couple of questions.

I want to build a 36 inch millstone that’s about 5 inches deep. Would I have an issues with concrete or hypertufa (weight and strength) with a stone this size?

-- -- Aleece, Central Texas

View Eklectic's profile

Eklectic

1824 posts in 2491 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-11-2008 02:00 AM

No problem whatsoever! The only problem would be to carry it afeter it is cured!

I have made garden benches the are approx. 48 inches 24×6 deep. They have been sitting in the forest for 2 years.
You might want to go and check this site.You have some of the best `Concrete Artist`from around the world on this site.

http://www.thegardenartforum.com/sb/index.php?mod=content&id=45&hid=30&itemid=

I sure hope you have fun!

-- Eklectic, Follow my Bliss, South East Ontario 5a

View francisgeo6's profile

francisgeo6

2 posts in 2248 days

09-28-2008 06:04 PM

I’ve purchased a millstone from an online cast stone store… muddleart.com. Passerbys are constantly asking me where I got it from.

Fancisgeo6

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14684 posts in 2691 days
hardiness zone 5b

09-28-2008 08:21 PM

do you have a picture? Sounds wonderful

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View francisgeo6's profile

francisgeo6

2 posts in 2248 days

02-05-2009 04:31 PM

I emailed a picture to the company and they posted it on their website. It was in their Gallery… http://www.muddleart.com/Gallery.htm

Francisgeo6

View wyndyacre's profile

wyndyacre

24 posts in 2315 days
hardiness zone 6a

02-09-2009 05:21 AM

I built a millstone fountain in a small pond last summer. The millstone is a small one purchased at an auction for around $15.00. I saved it for many years knowing I would make a fountain of it someday. I laid it in preformed pond, the pump beneath it providing a flow of water up thru the hole that cascades over the sides of the millstone. The pump’s electrical cord is threaded thru a hole in the wall of my barn/studio to plug in indoors.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

View GrandmaT's profile

GrandmaT

5389 posts in 2569 days
hardiness zone 9

02-09-2009 05:29 AM

Wow, that is really nice and what a great idea. The pond area is so very lovely … :-)

-- "A beautiful garden is a work of heart" --

View wyndyacre's profile

wyndyacre

24 posts in 2315 days
hardiness zone 6a

02-09-2009 05:31 AM

oops, double post

View dini's profile

dini

1591 posts in 2407 days
hardiness zone 5

02-09-2009 03:56 PM

What a lovely fountain and garden!

-- the day you quit learning is the day you quit living.

View jroot's profile

jroot

5081 posts in 2321 days
hardiness zone 5a

02-09-2009 05:16 PM

Your wee millstone pond looks really calming and refreshing. Well done.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: All views and comments posted by members are not necessarily those of GardenTenders.com or of those working on the site.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

LumberJocks.com :: woodworking showcase

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com