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Mildew/mold starting to appear in my seed trays

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Topic by krissifitz posted 1504 days ago 7295 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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krissifitz

4 posts in 1637 days

1504 days ago

So I just planted my seeds in my mini-greenhouse/seed tray last week and I have teeny tiny sprouts coming up but I noticed a little bit of fuzzy mold starting on a few of the pods… (I planted marigolds and portulacas)

should I remove them?
Is there something I can spray to prevent this on my next set of tray?
Is there a way to fix it now that it has started?

There are little air vents on my mini greenhouse so should I open those. I’m not sure how long you are supppose to leave them covered. I will post some pictures tonite after work.

Thanks for any suggestions!
Christine



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countrygal

362 posts in 2267 days

1504 days ago

Your tray is too wet.You could pick off the mold if it is just a bit,not sure what you mean by pods,but keep that lid off.I hate those lids as they cause more damage than good.

-- Southwestern Ontario Canada Zone5b

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DavesYard

304 posts in 1526 days
hardiness zone 5b

1504 days ago

I sprinkled ground cinnamon on all of my cups with new seedlings. I read it somewhere on the net that it helps with overly wet soil, fungus, and dampening off. I don’t know why it works but it’s working for me. I’ll try to look into it a bit more.

But yeah, your soil is too wet. Try taking the lid off and blowing some heat on it to dry it out a bit. Also try bottom-watering instead of top watering if possible, so the roots can suck up the moisture but it doesnt sit at the top.

(My, ive learned a lot on this site)

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DavesYard

304 posts in 1526 days
hardiness zone 5b

1504 days ago

From http://gardengal.net/page80.html

(also http://www.yougrowgirl.com/grow/seed_starting2.php has the same info only condensed)

There are some other tips that can help to prevent damping off:

You can pre-soak seeds in a blend of 3% Hydrogen Peroxide and water. Some gardeners prefer to purchase 35% Hydrogen Peroxide and dilute it at home to 3%. At the proper dilution, I have found that standard 3% Hydrogen Peroxide, even though it has fixatives, doesn’t harm my seeds or seedlings. Here’s the ratio of Peroxide to water:

Seed Soak: 2 TBSP. of Hydrogen Peroxide to 2 cups or 16 ounces of boiled and cooled distilled water.

Chamomile is an excellent agent to prevent damping off:

Use three chamomile teabags. Pour boiled distilled water and steep for fifteen to twenty minutes, then add the concentrate to a sterilized gallon milk jug and top off with more boiled distilled water. Once seedlings are up and growing, use this in a sterilized spray bottle to spritz and mist seedlings.

Hydrogen Peroxide again is also useful in preventing Damping-Off Disease after the seeds have sprouted:

This time, add 1 cup of 3% Hydrogen Peroxide to a gallon of boiled distilled water. Use this to mist seedlings.

You may be surprised to learn that cinnamon has excellent anti-fungal properties and acts as a deterrent to damping-off:

Simply sprinkle the surface of the potting medium with ground cinnamon.

Once seedlings start to emerge, remove any covering and put them under grow lights. This is crucial so that seedlings can grow stout and strong and this goes a long way to preventing damping-off.
Thin seedlings. Transplant them or remove them, but prevent overcrowding. Thinning assures that the remaining seedlings will be stronger and will grow normally. It also will help to maintain good air circulation between plants.

Preventing damping-off is a simple blend of common sense, cleanliness, and good gardening practice. By using some of these helpful hints and techniques, gardeners can nip damping-off in the bud. Try a few of these tips and see if your success rate increases!

Hope this helps.

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Bon

7371 posts in 2250 days
hardiness zone 5a

1504 days ago

I never use lids or plastic to cover my seedlings for the same reason.I too would take the lids off.
Dave pretty soon we will be calling you “Dave the Gardener from Whitby.” (lol) Good advice.

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

View Penny's profile

Penny

318 posts in 1805 days
hardiness zone 5b

1504 days ago

I’ve used cinnamon for years if that happens and it does work like a charm.

-- Gardening is Great Therapy!!.....Georgian Bay area....zone 5b

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weirdone

18 posts in 1144 days
hardiness zone 5

1126 days ago

Hi all by the way I”m an old farmer and jack of all trades .I just love to try to grow things .I built a grow room with heat pads grow lights etc, it’s supper insulated.I had trouble with mold , I cover things with plastic to keep things warmer. I figured i had a ventilation problem so i fixed up a computer fan with a stand it blows the air across the top of the starter trays witch at times are about 3×9 ft i don’t have any more mold i think air movement is more important than moisture. PS. Love ya all HF Wierdone

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jroot

4986 posts in 2100 days
hardiness zone 5a

1126 days ago

That is exactly what I think as well, Weirdone. Keep the air moving.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

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