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Lasagna beds! - Help!

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Topic by DavesYard posted 02-11-2010 03:29 PM 4191 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DavesYard

304 posts in 2933 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-11-2010 03:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lasagna bed raised bed vegetable garden manure fertilizer soil brands

Mmmm… lasagna… my favorite food.

No, this doesn’t belong in the recipe section!

This is my cry for help on the “lasagna system” for raised beds.

I would like to use this system for my vegetable gardens. I don’t even know where to start, so here are my questions:

- How many layers do you need and what are the layer components
- How early can I construct the beds and put in the lasanga system
- Is there any point at which I should mix up the layers with a shovel
- How long do I have to wait before I can plant vegetables
- What brand(s) of soil, fertilizer, manure, etc do you recommend

Thanks!



View XploreOrganics's profile

XploreOrganics

1393 posts in 3755 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-11-2010 04:07 PM

This is a cute video I found and pretty much followed what they did on a neighbors property last year…worked well.

-- Xploreorganics, 5b Canada, LFD 06-20 http://colorfulcanary.blogspot.com/

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3877 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-11-2010 04:12 PM

I’ll leave the technical stuff to the experts

here are my 2cent offerings:
  • I plan on building some more raised beds during our first “spring” .. when we get lovely weather they are going in. Then when the “winter” hits us again it can all sit there and do whatever it does naturally.. And then at planting time it should be good to go. (In theory that is)
  • once you get it established you want to disrupt it as little as possible, is my understanding .. don’t want to disturb those microbe communities too much
  • if you’re using somewhat fresh manure, you don’t want to be putting root vegetables into it this year… that’s my belief, anyway. Next year it will be fine.

and now I watch to see what the experts have to contribute.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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DavesYard

304 posts in 2933 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-11-2010 04:34 PM

How fresh is the bagged stuff that you would get at a Nursery? Can I plant in that right away?

I can’t see my wife agreeing to me actually hauling manure from a farm in our car, so i’m stuck with that stuff..

Great video. I see that it is:

newspaper (no glossy stuff)
composted manure
peat moss
hay
compost
repeat.

I guess it is not too technical.

Would I also add triple mix? What about stuff like nitrogen, calcium, phosphates, etc

View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3811 posts in 3506 days
hardiness zone 5a

02-11-2010 04:41 PM

Good quality bagged manure is very safe to use. It has aged, and composted, screened and is ready to use. Clean and sweet smelling. You can layer it with your other materials, and not worry about it burning your plants.

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

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DavesYard

304 posts in 2933 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-11-2010 04:45 PM

Awesome – thank you XO, MsDeb, and Iris!

I think I am going to go with your idea MsDeb and have several beds in a row, and I may put down some patio tiles that I have in between them so that mowing won’t be a pain. Can’t wait to get started! C’mooooon April!!

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3877 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-11-2010 05:14 PM

I didn’t watch the video .. computer not cooperating.. was it hay or straw?

options for between the beds:
  • the patio stones
  • straw/mulch (looks nice/natural
  • ground cover such as white clover, thyme,

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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DavesYard

304 posts in 2933 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-11-2010 06:21 PM

Im pretty sure it was straw..

When considering what type of wood to use for the beds, should I stay away from pressure-treated (green) stuff? I heard the chemical(s) that they use in it are harmful.

What’s the best type of wood to use? I think I will go with 4×4s

View XploreOrganics's profile

XploreOrganics

1393 posts in 3755 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-12-2010 03:42 AM

I personally will not use CCA orACQ treated wood. We use spruce timbers and I oil them in an old mixture of activated charcoal, sunflower or soybean oil and Iron oxide. You can also buy this wonderful product called Lifetime wood treatment, and for cheaper you can purchse regular lumber then treat it yourself with this non-toxic product : http://www.valhalco.com/

-- Xploreorganics, 5b Canada, LFD 06-20 http://colorfulcanary.blogspot.com/

View DavesYard's profile

DavesYard

304 posts in 2933 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-12-2010 07:30 AM

Looks like a great product. Have you seen it in any big box stores?

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3877 days
hardiness zone 5b

02-12-2010 07:41 AM

I bought mine at Home Hardware.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View StarrsWife's profile

StarrsWife

36 posts in 2960 days
hardiness zone 7

02-18-2010 02:36 AM

loved the video, :) theirs turned out soo much better than my feeble attempt, lol

-- Jessica~ Oklahoma zone 7 “A genius always presents himself as a fool” ~Anon.

View Alice's profile

Alice

49 posts in 2923 days
hardiness zone 6a

03-08-2010 12:34 AM

How long do you have to let the lasagna layering sit before you can plant in it?

Thanks!

-- Alice, Mountain Home, ID Zone 6a

View mario1360's profile

mario1360

921 posts in 3292 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-08-2010 08:12 AM

this kind of structure is very popular here, some folks plant right away , its ok if you dont use raw manure.
I did not have good succes with this type because my land is on fill, so lots of garbage under the first 4 inches of cheap topsoil….but if you live in the countryside its ideal.

-- south shore montreal, zone 5a, whish it was 9

View Bon's profile

Bon

7374 posts in 3657 days
hardiness zone 5a

03-08-2010 08:35 AM

Dave I have read that pressure treated wood is not as bad as it used to be for gardens.I plan to make a 4’ by 8’ bed this spring and I will be using PT wood.Not sure if I am going to use the landscape timbers or 4×4’s.I’ll decide after I price them out.If you use the triple mix it already has your manure and peat moss added to it.Sometimes I find it usually needs more peat moss to make it more fluffy so it doesn’t harden up like clay on you.This is just MHO.

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3139 days
hardiness zone 5b

03-08-2010 09:07 AM

Alice, I use the lasagna method all the time and it works well for me. For vegetables and annuals, I prefer to make my beds in the fall so that they will be ready in the spring. I have made them in the spring as well, but I use more compost than plant matter because I am not allowing the worms and microbes the time to break it down first. I guess how much time depends on how warm the soil is and what types of things you put in it. If there is too much decomposition going on when you plant your seeds or seedlings, the heat may burn up the tender roots.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View Josh's profile

Josh

42 posts in 3330 days

03-08-2010 09:40 AM

I did some rather large lasagna beds a few years back. My first layer was cardboard to kill the grass. I then topped with compost, leaves, and grass clippings. I would say I added about 12 inches of material. I didn’t worry about how much of what went in. Just try not to add wet clumps of grass. I then covered with wood chips. Make sure to give it a good water. I did mine in early spring so it got hit with a couple good snows. In order to get the material I asked friends for old leaf bags, and did a little garbage day hunting. leaf bags that have been sitting around over the winter are perfect as they have started to break down in the bag. Later that spring when it came time to plant. i just scooted the lasagna matter out of the way, added compost, and planted in that. The following spring all the leaves and cardboard had broke down. Worked awesome.

View Alice's profile

Alice

49 posts in 2923 days
hardiness zone 6a

03-08-2010 04:59 PM

So I just went out in the rain to get all my materials down before the snow storm coming in. I put a bed of leaves, straw and steer manure, does this sound ok? I thought that if anything in May I can remove the excess for the good soil underneath?

-- Alice, Mountain Home, ID Zone 6a

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3139 days
hardiness zone 5b

03-08-2010 05:11 PM

Alice, two months could very well be long enough. As Josh mentioned, if you make a hole and surround your transplants with compost when you put them into the bed, it isn’t as important that everything is broken down completely in the entire bed. Waiting at least sixty days is a good practice if you used fresh manure. Cardboard will take longer to break down than newspaper but it will eventually break down and become soil too. I predict you are going to have an awesome garden this year.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View Alice's profile

Alice

49 posts in 2923 days
hardiness zone 6a

03-08-2010 05:37 PM

Robin,I hope that your prediction is correct! I have all of my seeds except for the strawberries and raspberries that I am going to place in a raised bed. I plan to start my seedlings in a week; our location nursery hands out a chart for the best times to plant seedlings which was a huge time saver! I am also attending a class next weekend for raised bed gardening. I am getting excited! Yes, I am a gardening nerd!

-- Alice, Mountain Home, ID Zone 6a

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3877 days
hardiness zone 5b

03-08-2010 06:05 PM

“gardening nerds” :) AKA GardenTenders lol

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3139 days
hardiness zone 5b

03-08-2010 06:20 PM

Alice, you made me laugh! Thanks.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View Josh's profile

Josh

42 posts in 3330 days

03-08-2010 06:56 PM

Alice you sound good to go. You will be very pleased.

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