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First Fruits

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Project by Dchip posted 06-01-2011 02:53 PM 2615 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Updates on the Garden:

The tomato plants have grown big and the first flowers are quickly giving way to fruit.

The peppers are also flowering, but the first flowers have withered and died. I’m hoping this stops rather quickly, any hints on how to minimize this?

The salad greens have already been supplying our dinners for a couple of weeks now.

The herbs are almost big enough to not be wiped out by a single meal.

The first beet was pulled because its head was above the ground, and it ended up being about the size of a gumball. I hope the others are a bit bigger (though the container is a bit crowded, as these were planted as a first-time test)

That’s about it, the coming month should be quite a rewarding time in the garden. Hope everyone else’s efforts are starting to be rewarded as well.

-- Dan Chiappetta, NYC



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Dchip

32 posts in 2598 days

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10 comments so far

View justjoel's profile

justjoel

1063 posts in 2982 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 06-01-2011 05:06 PM

Nice patio, kitchen garden you’ve got going here.

I’m not sure, cause I’m no expert, but the problem with your peppers might be that they aren’t getting pollinated. I’m betting some of the experts here know of a technique or two to do that without the help of the bees and such.

Looks like your self-watering planter is working well, eh?

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3602 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-02-2011 06:56 AM

everything looks wonderful!!!!
good luck with the peppers. Never would have thought of the pollination aspect.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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justjoel

1063 posts in 2982 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 06-02-2011 11:21 AM

Hey, I’m no expert by any means, maybe someone with much more experience will confirm or refute my theory.

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

View sharad's profile

sharad

1671 posts in 2819 days
hardiness zone 11

posted 06-02-2011 01:13 PM

You have a lovely garden and the results look good except for the peppers.

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3602 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-02-2011 05:55 PM

this is a copy/paste from someone else’s copy/paste that I found. Original source: GardenWeb

”Blossom-Drop” is a condition suffered by tomatoes, peppers, snap beans, and some other fruiting vegetables where the plant blooms but fails to set fruit, the blooms die and fall off. It may be caused by the use of excess nitrogen fertilizers or dry windy conditions, but the most common cause is temperature extremes. Tomatoes,
peppers and beans are especially picky about the air temps when it comes time to set fruit. If the night temps fall below 55 or rise above 75 or if the day temps are above 90, the pollen becomes tacky and non-viable. Pollination cannot occur. If the bloom isn’t pollinated, the bloom dies and falls off.

Control: Water the plants deeply once a week, mulch heavily to maintain constant soil moisture levels, establish windbreaks as needed, avoid using excessive amounts of nitrogen fertilizers, and wait for temperatures to moderate and stabilize. Earlier timed planting can help attain fruit set prior to the on-set of high temps, and the use of protection can compensate for cool nights. Some recommend attempting hand-pollination with an artist brush or a gentle shaking of the plant/cage/support prior to the hottest part of the day will also help. Fruit set will resume when temperatures moderate. Hormone sprays, such as “Blossom Set”, may prevent some blossom drop due to LOW temperatures. However, the resulting fruit are often misshapen. But studies prove that hormone sprays do not prevent blossom drop due to HIGH temperatures.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

101 posts in 2213 days
hardiness zone 8a

posted 06-03-2011 04:23 AM

Very cool plants….I am not sure if this applies …and i am by no means an expert at anything in gardening…but i have heard that when squash plant flowers fall off when they first start making they are male….the females make the actual squash…...maybe something like that with your fallen blooms tooo?

Sandra :)

-- http://www.joeandsandrashippies.blogspot.com

View Dchip's profile

Dchip

32 posts in 2598 days

posted 06-03-2011 09:04 AM

Thanks for the input everyone. It has been pretty hot around here for a week, probably close to 90, so maybe that’s it. I’m hoping it’s just the first couple blossoms. There are a lot so a couple lost is not too big of a deal. Pollinating each individual flower is something I would like to avoid, though I suppose if it comes down to that or no peppers at all…

-- Dan Chiappetta, NYC

View justjoel's profile

justjoel

1063 posts in 2982 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 06-03-2011 10:41 AM

So, Sandra, you’re saying a little “failure to launch” kinda thing on the male side, huh? :-)’ Well, maybe there’s a little “blue pill” for that…

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

View Bon's profile

Bon

7374 posts in 3382 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 06-04-2011 08:58 AM

What a great container garden you have going there.Nice job.

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3811 posts in 3231 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 06-04-2011 09:08 AM

I’m sure you are going to harvest a good crop of everything you have growing. Your container garden looks great. Good job!!

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

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