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2010 Vegetable Gardens (Listing and Photos)

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Project by Radicalfarmergal posted 1501 days ago 4108 views 0 times favorited 37 comments Add to Favorites Watch

2010 Vegetable Gardens

Hurray! All of my vegetable gardens are planted and mulched. This year I scattered my vegetables around the yard, in both my conventional vegetable garden and also around the base of my fruit trees and bushes as I start to create permanent plant guilds, moving toward the idea of eliminating tilling and creating an edible forest garden. As I harvest plants, I will try to reseed bare areas for either a second harvest crop or a cover crop (to help return nutrients to the soil), but I am declaring the spring planting is finished!

Upper Garden (Divided into wide rows between mulched walkways) east to west
Raised Beds:

Cherry Tree Guild – Welsh onions, Brussel sprouts, Horseradish, strawberries, Sweet Cicely
Cherry Tree Guild

Blueberry bushes
Sea Buckthorn bushes
Jerusalem Artichokes (I did not get them all moved in time and now they are huge again!)
Raspberries,
Cucumber, Pole Beans, Basil and Peanuts
Cucumbers, Pole Beans, Basil and Peanuts

Asparagus,

Row One:
Sugar Snap Peas – will be replaced by pole beans as temperatures rise)
Lettuce and Spinach – will be replaced with Chard, Beets or Bush Beans
Chard, Onion, Garlic

Row Two:
Broccoli Raab, Red Cabbage, Potatoes, Onions, Amaranth, Loveage, Sea Kale (the lone survivor)

Row Three:
Zucchini, Globe Artichokes

Rows Four, Five and Six:
The Three Sisters Guild: Popcorn, Pole Beans, Pumpkins

Row Seven:
Beets, Carrots, Chard, Onions, Garlic, Rosemary, Fennel, Red Basil, Bush Beans

Lower Garden east to west

Apple Tree Guild – Goumi shrub, Rhubarb, Comfrey, Egyptian Walking Onions, Yarrow, Catnip, Bee Balm, Bergamot, Cucumber

Raised bed of strawberry plants

Raised bed of Horseradish, Bell Pepper, Amish Paste Tomato, Basil, Sweet Cicely, one surviving Cauliflower, Welsh Onions, Pole Beans (I had a pie cherry tree growing here, but it mysteriously died last summer; now I am letting the beans use the dead tree as a trellis.)

Block One:
Amish Paste Tomatoes, Genovese Basil, Nasturtiums

Block Two:
Marglobe Tomatoes, Genovese Basil, Nasturtiums, Bush Beans (nitrogen fixing crop to help feed tomatoes, I may chop them down if they start to compete with the tomatoes for space.)

Block Three:
Brandywine Tomatoes, Genovese Basil, Nasturtiums, Bush Beans

Block Four/Apple Tree Guild:
Vegetables: Red Cabbage, Bell Pepper
Flowers: Phlox, Amaranth, Calendula. Bachelor Buttons, Yarrow, Bee Balm
Herbs: Comfrey, Chamomile, Sage, Bergamot
Apple Tree Guild

Garden/Guild behind Silver Maple

Tomato plants: Amish paste, Marglobe, Brandywine, Rutgers (all heirlooms)
Romanian Gogosari Pepper
Elderberry, Persimmon Tree and Cornelian Cherry Seedlings
Garden/Guild behind Silver Maple

Garden/Guilds along Goat Pasture Fence:

Vegetables: Potatoes, Peppers, Onions, Brussel sprouts
Herbs: Comfrey, Sweet Cecily, Bee Balm, Bergamot
Elderberry, Goumi, Aronia and Red Currant Seedlings
Apple Trees
Pasture Fence Garden/Guild

Other scattered annual fruit/vegetables include the watermelon vines and French Sorrel in the berry patches.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout



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Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

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37 comments so far

View jroot's profile

jroot

5046 posts in 2197 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 1501 days ago

WOW ! Phenomenal ! You have really worked hard to make your homestead into a productive place. You can almost entirely “live off the land”. Well done.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14670 posts in 2567 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1501 days ago

dang that’s amazing!
Again, I am in awe and realize that I have so much more to do and to learn!

Bowing in your “presence”. Fantastic!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3793 posts in 2196 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 1501 days ago

Robin, jroot and MsDeb said it all. And your plants are so far ahead of mine. Of course what I have planted is only a drop compared to yours, :) but then I don’t have a family with two growing boys to feed. Apart from the the necessity of producing food for your family, you have created an aesthetic garden throughout your homestead. Really lovely!

I really enjoyed seeing your pictures. I have tried to imagine how your gardens are laid out from your earlier post and now I can ‘see’ how you have arranged you traditional garden and the guilds you are creating. Love it. Wish I was 40 years younger so I could follow your example. :)

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

View soobee's profile

soobee

204 posts in 1774 days
hardiness zone 3

posted 1501 days ago

:)

-- bee with what is...:) soob

View sharad's profile

sharad

1620 posts in 1784 days
hardiness zone 11

posted 1501 days ago

Robin, I am amazed how you manage such a huge plot of land with such a numerous varieties of vegetables. Only a systematic gardener like you can do this gigantic task. Are some of these vegies for the goats as well?
May God give you good health to continue with your efforts.

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14670 posts in 2567 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1501 days ago

what all do you use for mulch?

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Bon's profile

Bon

7374 posts in 2347 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 1501 days ago

What a fantastic job you have done Robin.Your gardens look great.And so well laid out.My hat’s off to you lady I can see how much work you have put in there.Amazing.What a great variety of veggies you have and even the variety of flowers you are getting now all make them look so nice.Well done.

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1501 days ago

Thank you for your nice comments, everyone. I am very proud of my vegetable garden this year; I hope it continues to thrive and produce. The variety and quantity or vegetables, flowers and herbs increased dramatically in comparison to previous years primarily because of the winter sowing project. I had to use all those little seedlings that grew!

Sharad: Excess vegetables will be shared with friends and neighbors and then goats and chickens. Sometimes the goats and chickens escape and take a few vegetables without asking!

Debbie: I rely heavily on mulch to eliminate/reduce weeds, retain moisture and build soil from the top down. I think mulch is what has really built up the soil I have in my garden over the years, helping my plants grow and thrive. I use a variety of mulches:
- Mulch from the chickens and goats. During the winter, I use the deep litter method of adding wood shavings every few days to keep the nitrogen/carbon at a healthy balance and provide clean bedding for the animals. By the end of the winter, the litter is well over a foot deep. With pens of almost 175 square feet, that provides me with a good supply of fertilized mulch. After I move the animals outside in the spring, I pile up the mulch, wet it and let it start composting before I spread it around my plants.
- Tree leaves (mostly Maple) in the fall are either added to gardens near shrubs where they will not blow away or they are put into the goat and chicken pen as litter. They disappear over the coarse of the winter into the deep litter pile.
- As you might remember from an earlier blog, I traded some beer for some ten year old partially composted hay. This is what I used on top of cardboard for my pathways and to eliminate the grass around the raised beds. When bark falls off our firewood, I pile it up and add the bark to the garden pathways.
- Pine needles. I don’t have any large pine trees myself, but I have generous neighbors and relatives. I try to rake up piles of pine needles every year and put them around my blueberries and acid loving flowers, such as rhododendrons.
- My living fence garden relies primarily on hemlock mulch that I buy and have delivered in six cubic yard increments. I would rather use a locally produced mulch but I don’t have enough.
- My newest type of mulch is that I purchased white clover seed and I have scattered it in my blueberry beds. I am hoping to grow a thick green cover mulch. If it works around the blueberries, I will try it on a section of the living fence as well.
Sorry for the long answer. In short, I use whatever I can find that I think will suppress weeds, retain soil moisture and return nutrients to the soil.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14670 posts in 2567 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1500 days ago

thank you for the long answer!
I put maple leaves under the blueberries to help “acidify” the soil.

Last year I had planted clover around the tomatoes – I think it worked really well. I left the clover in the raised bed and having been pulling it now and again and spreading the pulled clover on my other raised beds. Don’t know what that does but I thought it might be a good idea :)

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View donjoe's profile

donjoe

220 posts in 1552 days
hardiness zone 7

posted 1500 days ago

An amazing garden layout. That’s alot to take care of. Everything looks wonderful.

-- Donnie in sunny South Carolina

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

882 posts in 1664 days
hardiness zone 4a

posted 1500 days ago

Awesome garden Robin. I can barely keep up! You’ve got tons of interesting things in there but I couldn’t help notice that you were growing peanuts. How cool is that. Do add an extra line in any followup for me on how your peanuts are doing!

-- Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. - Thoreau

View Penny's profile

Penny

318 posts in 1902 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1500 days ago

Well done,!

-- Gardening is Great Therapy!!.....Georgian Bay area....zone 5b

View stefang's profile

stefang

393 posts in 1546 days
hardiness zone 7

posted 1500 days ago

I can only agree with all the positive comments above Robin. You have a very impressive garden and I can see that your family must eat well and healthy to boot. I admire your work ethic and the intelligent way you go about it. I loved that rustic fence too. Your family is very lucky to have you.

-- Mike the reluctant gardening assistant of Lillian

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1499 days ago

Thank you!

Stefang, I feel really lucky to have my family; it wouldn’t be fun to do all this work if I wasn’t able to do it for and with them.

Steve, this is actually our second year growing peanuts. My children requested that we grow cucumbers, popcorn and peanuts every year. Peanuts require a long growing season so we started them in our cold frame in late April. They require 120 – 130 days to mature so we will harvest them in late August/early September. I will try to post a blog and photos when we harvest them. : )

You are welcome, Debbie, and thanks for letting me know about your experience with clover and tomatoes. I think a living green mulch is the direction I will be heading for much of my gardens. I am doing some experimenting this year with the blueberries but I can see using it throughout my gardens.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14670 posts in 2567 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1499 days ago

I just bought some blueberry plants from our local grower (and lifelong friend) – for a VERY good price, I might add.

Here are his tips re: blueberries
  • dig a hole about 3 times the size of the container
  • put peat moss around the plant
  • cover it all with sawdust.
  • cover them with netting to keep the birds from getting all of your harvest

He says that sawdust is the best mulch because it is so compact; it keep the moisture in, the weeds, out and helps keep the soil acidic.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14670 posts in 2567 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1499 days ago

oh and he said that by mixing the varieties of blueberry bushes you get bigger berries.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1499 days ago

Debbie, I predict you will be very happy to have blueberries. If they like where they are planted, they thrive! Here are a few pictures of our three year old plants. They are loaded this year!
Blueberry Bushes 2010

You can see the pine needle mulch I use. I wish I had more to use, they seem to love it!

A photo of some of the white clover living mulch that has taken root around a blueberry plant and is starting to spread:

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View Greenthumb's profile

Greenthumb

2287 posts in 2387 days

posted 1498 days ago

I quite admire your perserverance, your dedication and ambition Robin. All your hard work certainly shows in your beautiful, bountiful gardens.

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1498 days ago

Thank you, Roman. Come on down to the states and I will bake you a pie. : )

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14670 posts in 2567 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1498 days ago

the pine needles increase the acidity.
last year we had a great crop of blueberries, but alas the rabbits took us back to square one.

you have a great crop this year!! LOVELY… my mouth is watering :)

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Bon's profile

Bon

7374 posts in 2347 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 1498 days ago

Blueberries.Mmmm,Mmmm.I love them made into a warm sauce and put on pancakes.

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1498 days ago

Debbie, your next woodworking project might have to be that cool LJ fence project you linked a while back. It is too frustrating to work that hard and lose your plants to rabbits!

Bon, we are watching and waiting for the blueberries to ripen. We especially like them fresh or in blueberry muffins and blueberry pancakes.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View jroot's profile

jroot

5046 posts in 2197 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 1498 days ago

I am impressed with your blueberry patch. Here, we would lose them for sure to the squirrels and the rabbits. We are not allowed , by covenant restrictions, to put up enclosing fences. Food products, we have to grow in large pots on the deck. I don’t know whether blueberries would survive our winters on the deck. Any thoughts on that?

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14670 posts in 2567 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1498 days ago

I know, Robin. I have to create fence to keep the rabbits out in the winter and can hold a netting during the growing season so the birds don’t get all the harvest.

I freeze my blueberries (what I don’t eat right from the patch) and then put a handful on my cereal during the winter months.

Jroot—interesting idea. I just paid $6 for a plant. That would have been an OK investment to try out the deck theory. But, alas, they are already in the ground now

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1498 days ago

Jroot, I am relatively new to this freezing-cold, long-winter experience. The plants I have in containers I either bring into the house during the winter (frost sensitives) or bury them to the soil line in one of my garden beds until spring. That way, it is as if they were in the ground. Maybe I am making too much work for myself but I haven’t lost one yet. If you can’t bury the pots in the winter, maybe you could wrap it up in burlap to give it some extra protection from the cold. In my previous house, I had some single stem apple trees that I kept in very large containers through the winter but I brought them inside the unheated garage for the winter after they had gone dormant. I would water them periodically so that the roots would not totally dry out. How large of a pot do you think a blueberry plant would need? I have seen blueberry plants, such as the “Top Hat” variety that are recommended for containers. If you try it, I wish you luck and lots of delicious blueberries.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View jroot's profile

jroot

5046 posts in 2197 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 1498 days ago

Hmmm. I’ll have to check out the Top Hat variety. How big a root ball do your blueberry plants have?

On a somewhat similar topic vein, I ordered two kinds of honeyberries. They sent me ONE, and it appears to be QUITE dead. I’ve tried for a week to rehydrate it, but it does not look good. They (Spring Garden) say that they will send me another, but I won’t be holdiing my breath.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14670 posts in 2567 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1498 days ago

I’m supposed to be having honeyberries on their way .. (HenryFields) but I’m having difficulty contacting them re: my remaining order)... I’ll have to call them tomorrow.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View jroot's profile

jroot

5046 posts in 2197 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 1498 days ago

I think they might be the same company under differing names. I’ve written them to see just what is happening, and how they stand behind their product. We’ll see how they respond.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14670 posts in 2567 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1498 days ago

crossing my fingers!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1498 days ago

Jroot, all my blueberry bushes are the high bush variety. You probably wouldn’t want one of those as they can grow over six feet tall. When I planted them as small, bare root plants three years ago, the roots easily fit in a one foot diameter hole. My personal experience with Henry Fields is that they stand behind their product. I have ordered huckleberry bushes, honey berry bushes and four persimmon trees from them and all but one persimmon tree thrived. (It was bare root and never wakened from its dormant condition.) When I called about the one persimmon tree, they immediately offered to send another one without any difficulty.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View jroot's profile

jroot

5046 posts in 2197 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 1498 days ago

Good news indeed.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View justjoel's profile

justjoel

1058 posts in 1947 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 1493 days ago

Oh what I wouldn’t give to have that much space to plant veggies. My main garden is a fenced 12’x24’ space that I cram in more than I should. I have two kinds of squash and a couple of artichokes growing outside this main space (plus two pear trees), but still isn’t enough. I too am in a 5b zone, but we’ve had such freakish weather that my garden is just getting started. Beautiful stuff, Robin.

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1492 days ago

Thank you, Joel. I feel very fortunate to have such a wonderful place to grow my own food. It takes a lot of time and energy, but I find it so rewarding. I hope the weather cooperates for you. No matter what we do as gardeners, we are never really in control. Despite all our efforts, a late freeze, a hailstorm, insects, a drought or other natural occurrences can undo the work and energy we have put into our gardens.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View justjoel's profile

justjoel

1058 posts in 1947 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 1468 days ago

That freakish weather we had here in Reno took some of the early pumpkins I started and cut my pear crop by more than half – and getting a late start, I was one of the lucky ones in town. I’m familiar with the idea that real control is an illusion – I have two small children who remind me of that every day.

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 1467 days ago

Sorry to hear about your loss of harvest, Joel. I am glad you did save some pears and I hope you replanted the pumpkins. We had searing, dry heat for a two-week period and I lost a young persimmon tree and an elderberry that were in an exposed place. The soil is still very dry, but at least the heat has dropped about ten degrees back to a more normal weather pattern.

I will try to take an updated photo of our garden today; the popcorn and some of the tomato plants are towering over my head!

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View lavender22's profile

lavender22

85 posts in 519 days
hardiness zone 8a

posted 515 days ago

You are one busy man and what a awesome job on everything:)

-- I love hostas:)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4296 posts in 1829 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 513 days ago

Thank you for the compliment, Lavender22. The garden isn’t keeping me busy these days. It is all tucked in under a thick blanket of snow.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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