GardenTenders

herb garden

  • Advertise with us
Project by syble posted 01-27-2008 11:11 AM 3202 views 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I adore herbs, if for nothing other then the smells! Nothing like walking by the lomon balm and brushing it and smelling the lmon drift through th whole garden! I grow primarily culinary herbs. Currently My herb garden is technically a row within my main veggie garden, but due to the perrenial nature of many of the herbs I hope to get them their own out of the way plot.

I am a basil hog! For what ever reason I grab hold of any kind of basil I can find, favourites being lemon, sweet and purple ruffles. I grow the following:
Lemon
Lime
Sweet
Cinnamon
Thai
Siam Queen
Spicey Globe
Purple ruffles
Red
I always look for new and exciting varieties, they’re great compact and bushy plants (i do pinch and cut back a few times a year), flowers are attractive (and the sign that they’re in need of a hard cut back), come in a wide variety of smells and tastes, and problem free.

Next in the row was summer savoury, i did absoloutley nothing with it, didn’t know how to use it. I’m still learing how to use many herbs, but alteast I use pretty much everything else.

Lemon balm is quite possibly my favourite lemon smelling herb. It’s industructable and has great lemon fragrance, what more can you ask for? Supposed to be good for teas aswell for digestion.

Oregano, I grow only the golden and greek forms, mostly because I have seen no others offered. The golden like many yellow plants grows at a slower rate then the greek and is more compact and low laying.

Thyme is one of those emerging herbs in my garden. I know how to use it in a limited capacity and am experimenting with it on a regular basis to find what really works well with it. Currently I grow 3 kinds:
Citrus
Lemon varrigated
Regular
There isn’t as much variety out there for culinary thyme, however there is increasing amounts of landscape thyem out there. DON’T get them confused!

Sage is one of those herbs I haven’t used (as the only thing I know to use it with is turkey), but really like the plant. Has nice habbit, leaves, colours and strong fragrance that I like undisterbed hehe. I grow
Purple
Golden
Tricolour
Bergmont
I find them all simular except the bergmont. It has a distict oudour bigger and thicker leaves aswell as i think a higher amount of oil.

Lemon verbena was one of my impulse buys, saw lemon, smelt lemon and thew it in the cart. Never used it, thought the tag said it was good for drinks and iced teas. I only had the one plant so I’m not sur if it was the plant or the variety, but it did not preform well in my garden at all!

Variegated peppermint was cosen because the variegated variety is known to be less vigorous. Weeds can be a challenge enough in the garden, I don’t need to be fighting invasive herbs also. grew it for the purpose of drying and putting it into tea for digestion.

Chives. I grew both Garlic and regular chives. I’d had the regular chives for a while so they are noticably bigger. The garlic ones were started from seed this year, and do not seam as tough as the regular ones. I’ll see how they preform this year. Very versitile plants!

Stevia the sugar suplement. I wowed alot of people with this plant this year. Shame to say that I didn’t end up harvesting it in the fall (just don’t know how to process it), very unique though, if I see it again in the spring, will grow it again.

Parsley, I grow all that I can get ahold of! Not only can it be used for just about anything, its also a major host plant for the black swallowtail:
caterpillar

Dill which is probably technically “the” weed herb in my garden, but we love it so its ok. It sprouts up wild all over and is often left if it’s in an ok place (most notably growing with cucumbers on the grates). We grow way more then any one could possibly use, but again we grow it for the black swallowtail as it is a major host plant. The larve are harmles, they eat a bit from here and there, we never have noticable damage, and the adults a beautiful to wach and benificail!

Thats most of my herb garden in a nut shell, Nice and easy to take care of, and super productive!
Thanks
sib ;)



View syble's profile

syble

126 posts in 3683 days

Project tags/keywords

Embed This Project

GardenTenders Code

HTML Code

URL/IMG Code

Preview this project card


17 comments so far

View gardenmentor's profile

gardenmentor

133 posts in 3683 days
hardiness zone 8

posted 01-27-2008 11:35 AM

I look forward to hearing more. I’m curious how the sage collection performed over time…

-- GardenMentor, Seattle, WA, www.gardenmentors.com & www.gardenhelp.org

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 01-27-2008 12:27 PM

Nice.
the photos are beautiful as well

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View XploreOrganics's profile

XploreOrganics

1393 posts in 3755 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 01-27-2008 01:04 PM

I Love the variegated sage….What variety is that?

-- Xploreorganics, 5b Canada, LFD 06-20 http://colorfulcanary.blogspot.com/

View syble's profile

syble

126 posts in 3683 days

posted 01-27-2008 02:33 PM

This is the first year so I’m not sure if the sage will over winter or not, it grew very well over the summer and the plants got huge! There are 2 variegated sages, one is tricolour, the other is golden. oth are simular in taste, texture and habits.
Thanks
sib ;)

View GrandmaT's profile

GrandmaT

5389 posts in 3754 days
hardiness zone 9

posted 01-27-2008 02:45 PM

Learning so much about veggie and herb gardening … wow.

-- "A beautiful garden is a work of heart" --

View gardenmentor's profile

gardenmentor

133 posts in 3683 days
hardiness zone 8

posted 01-27-2008 03:00 PM

Thanks for sharing. A few things I’ve learned over the years:

1. Those tiny sage plants are likely to get to be 4-5’ wide. You might replant with long-term growth in mind to give them room.

2. Lemon Balm: can become really weedy. If you get seedlings, consider removing them. Often seedlings don’t maintain the best fragrance and taste.

3. Lemon verbena: Nothing like it. I prefer it in cooking over lemon grass and lemon balm. It’s a slice of heaven. (May not make it through rough winters or will act like an herbaceous perennial rather than woody perennial)

4. Purple sage has really pungent sage flavor. I cut the amount used in recipes if I harvest from purple.

5. Chives. Be careful not to let them go to seed. I’m still battling seedlings from my own “go to seed” problem a couple of years ago.

Enjoy & thanks! I can’t wait until its basil-growing season again in Seattle!

-- GardenMentor, Seattle, WA, www.gardenmentors.com & www.gardenhelp.org

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3876 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 01-27-2008 03:21 PM

lots of information here!
thanks everyone

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View syble's profile

syble

126 posts in 3683 days

posted 01-27-2008 06:52 PM

I have learned the hard way gardenmentor not to let most herbs go to seed. I had an incident with horehound about 5 years ago, afterwhich i eliminated the plant and any trace I could find (this is back when my garden was raised beds) I still see errant seedlings now and again (I kill them quick!). Chive flowers get beheaded as soon as i see them, on a side note they dry remarkably well! When we moved in years ago, the grass between our driveway and the neighbours feild was throughly infested with chives, we mowed them over with the grass but they are still there just not nearly so many, apparently they don’t like being 4” tall! Because of the exposure out here(really bad wind and lack of protection on my part), sage in the past hasn’t made it through the winter, I know my boyfriend has some impressive typical sage bushes at his house that has been there for years. Although I should say that both the sage and the rosemary were both alive still last week when I was out there.

In general I try not to let my herbs even flower let alone seed, I just look for flowers and cut/pinch or even shear them back. I seam to recall that when you let herbs flower they loose their flavour also, or its not as strong?
Thanks
Sib ;)

View gardenmentor's profile

gardenmentor

133 posts in 3683 days
hardiness zone 8

posted 01-28-2008 01:09 PM

That’s an interesting question about flowering herbs losing flavor. My experience has been that they are most flavorful as they flower, but I can’t say for sure that’s the case. Certainly if they’re putting energy into flowering, they’re depleting resources elsewhere, but where…hmmm…I’m going to think/research on this one…thanks for the challenge!

-- GardenMentor, Seattle, WA, www.gardenmentors.com & www.gardenhelp.org

View Jason's profile

Jason

840 posts in 3730 days
hardiness zone 5

posted 01-28-2008 10:19 PM

Agreed…in my experience, the herbs are at their most flavorful right at the verge of blooming.

My culinary herbs I don’t let bloom, or only barely bloom before I behead them. The medicinal and ornamental herbs I let flower since they are there mostly for ornamental effect. Lady’s mantle get ugly after barely a week of blooming, and rue seed pods are neat for the first few, but the tiny yellow blossoms are fun.

My lemon balm was getting a bit out of hand at the end of last season; I’ll have to take care to keep it trim this year!

-- Living on the square...Metro Detroit

View Eklectic's profile

Eklectic

1824 posts in 3676 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 01-29-2008 07:40 AM

Hi,
I have an “Herb Garden” and then I have them growing in different beds for different “effects”.
I do have all the herbs i can find, not always using them for cooking, but enjoying the looks, smells and the diversity.
I have been growing sage for many years, and even managed to harvest some after frost.

As well, as a lot of herbs are low maintenance,so they are perfect for “xeroscaping”.

Follow your Bliss!
Eklectic

-- Eklectic, Follow my Bliss, South East Ontario 5a

View Thor's profile

Thor

3 posts in 3676 days

posted 01-29-2008 06:36 PM

Hi. Your garden is beautiful. I would like to see more pictures.
Also, you seem to be a good person to ask. I’m designing the gardens around a newly constructed house. I’ve had gardens for many years, ornamental as well as vegetable and herb. My new gardens will be mostly edible landscaping with berries, herbs and some annuals to fill in. My question is, other than rosemary, are there any evergreen herbs that would make a good landscape plant?
Thanks in advance.
Christina

-- www.funkychickenartproject.com

View syble's profile

syble

126 posts in 3683 days

posted 01-29-2008 07:35 PM

sage is ever green aswell. Where are you located? that may limit plantings. I assume you’ve let everything settle eh? Otherwise you’ll end up with sunken borders :S
Sib ;)

View Jason's profile

Jason

840 posts in 3730 days
hardiness zone 5

posted 01-29-2008 07:36 PM

Christina, there are tons! It depends on the light exposure, height, and overall shape and color you’re after…and of course, your planting zone.

Lots of sages are great for year round color. Mine just reappeared from melting snowbanks this week, still in full leaf.

-- Living on the square...Metro Detroit

View Thor's profile

Thor

3 posts in 3676 days

posted 01-30-2008 04:36 PM

Hi again,
I’m in north Georgia where we have mild winters compared to a lot of places, but my sage doesn’t winter over at all. It dies back to the ground and reappears in the spring. My rosemary manages through the winter very well, and the range of sizes and colors is variable, because I have a lot of space since I’m doing paths and plantings. No grass.
How can I find lists of evergreen herbs? Do you know of a list on the web? I order from catalogs often, but they don’t say what they look like over the winter, and my experience is proving that my guessing system is lacking and I’ve been gardening for 30 years! I just want this garden to look good through all 4 seasons, because it’s so close to my new house.

Thanks for suggestions in advance.
Christina

-- www.funkychickenartproject.com

View Eklectic's profile

Eklectic

1824 posts in 3676 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 01-30-2008 05:10 PM

Hi,
I am further north than you and my sage overwinters quite well and I do not much it: I am a lazy gardener.

But I remember what it looks like in the Spring and how the first year I was going to dig it out, then forgot about it and when I came back to it, it had new shoots all along those “dead” branches. And it has been going for 7 years now.(one of the plants we dug up when we moved).
My lavender is doing quite well, so is the thyme.
I do harvest in the middle of winter (as I need it)by digging in the snow.

I have some new sage plants in a new bed, it is covered by snow now but I am looking forward to see how it fares.

-- Eklectic, Follow my Bliss, South East Ontario 5a

View gardenmentor's profile

gardenmentor

133 posts in 3683 days
hardiness zone 8

posted 01-30-2008 05:26 PM

Don’t forget lavender as an “evergreen”... or “evergrey”. Also, thyme is a nice edging evergreen. Pineapple sage and lemon verbena can remain evergreen in milder environments. Also, some oreganos. Parsley also overwinters well even if you get a bit of a freeze.

-- GardenMentor, Seattle, WA, www.gardenmentors.com & www.gardenhelp.org

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: All views and comments posted by members are not necessarily those of GardenTenders.com or of those working on the site.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

LumberJocks.com :: woodworking showcase

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com