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Transforming the Blueberry Patch (in progress)

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Project by MsDebbieP posted 08-04-2013 09:16 PM 1639 views 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Transforming the Blueberry Patch (in progress)
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August 3/13

The Past
A couple of years ago we moved the blueberries and fenced them in, after the rabbits had gnawed them off almost to the ground. It was a good plan and worked rather well. We then threw the maple leaves in the fall into the fenced in area creating great fertilizer for the area. I also planted some fruit trees to be pruned espalier-style along the fences and, this spring, moved the honeyberry bushes inside the area, beside the blueberries.

The Present
1. bindweed has taken over the area, running rampant and making a thick blanket of weeds throughout the entire area, climbing all of the plants.
2. the blueberry bushes are not looking very good, perhaps the soil isn’t right, perhaps the bindweed has done damage
3. Rick doesn’t like blueberries—so all the work is just for me and I could pick some at our local blueberry farm if I wanted to
4. I am really enjoying my morning walks, up and down the pathways in my yard

so…..

The Future
  • Remove the blueberries
  • open up the fences so the lawnmower can get in there and keep the bindweed cut down.
  • plant something else where the blueberries were.
Step 1
  • I have opened up one section of the fence and the mower has already done its job and make a walkway – and it looks so nice!
  • the other walkway will have to wait: 1) I need another fence post put in the ground to support the espalier tree branches and 2) I have some beans and tomatoes growing along the other end and I have to wait until they are done before I can take down the fence at that end; so that has to wait until September
Step 2
  • plant something else in the central area.
    I originally thought that I would put three fruit trees, keeping them pruned small but then I remembered that the septic bed is probably exactly where I want to plant—and have already planted some of the trees. OOPS. I’ll cross my fingers for what is already planted but I don’t want to add to the risk by planting more.

The honeyberries only fill about half of the row.

So the question is: what to put in the middle section?

(Oh, and to the left, or above the area, is the labyrinth)

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)



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MsDebbieP

14683 posts in 2661 days
hardiness zone 5b

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4 comments so far

View CampD's profile

CampD

56 posts in 1059 days
hardiness zone 4b

posted 08-06-2013 11:26 AM

I always like to plant my rows (blueberries, rasberries & X-mas trees) wide enough apart so that I can ride the lawntractor between them. Grass is far easier to control than the weeds.
JMO but than again I have enough space to do that.

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14683 posts in 2661 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 08-06-2013 11:32 AM

I agree.

I have packed the blueberry patch with leaves and haven’t had to worry about it until this year, when the bindweed took over. Last year it was bad but this year it was impossible to control it. So it is time for a re-do.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View wolfsburg18's profile

wolfsburg18

2 posts in 619 days

posted 09-04-2013 09:20 PM

Good luck with your garden. While I prefer organic gardening in some cases the use of chemicals is necessary and bindweed is one of the exceptions. I have been battling bind weed for years in my lawn and garden after purchasing my first house in 2009. Only this summer have I been successful in removing bindweed from my lawn and around my garden. I found that multiple applications of weed control which contains Quinclorac in high amounts addresses the bindweed.

Good luck.

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14683 posts in 2661 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 09-05-2013 10:02 AM

good information.

it’s almost a “start over” situation >>> kill it all and plant again.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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