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Buzzy Bees

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Project by Scott Hildenbrand posted 325 days ago 1207 views 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Decided this year to jump in and get some bees. Figured I’d go with a top bar hive to start things out before I invest much into it. So far, it’s pretty fun and MOSTLY hands off. I’ve had to correct some comb issues several times though.

And now, for a boring inspection video. They’re doing well, though the comb is wonkey on several bars.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-5Dz0tgGeE

Someone remind me. Is there a way to embed a video in posts? :p

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b



View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1689 posts in 2245 days
hardiness zone 6b

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bee bees honey bee hive hive pollination

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11 comments so far

View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3763 posts in 2103 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 325 days ago

I knew you’d have something very interesting to share with us, Scott! Good job! You are going to enjoy that fresh honey, I hope without too many stings. LOL

I found the video very interesting too. It’s nice to see the honey bees are still around and working. I wish you all the luck in the world to help those little guys along. We need everyone of them.

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

View jroot's profile

jroot

4989 posts in 2103 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 325 days ago

Well done, Scott.

My father was a keeper of bees for most of his life. I beileve he had 30 hives per yard, and almost as many different bee yards. That honey helped put the 4 of us kids through university. When I was born, he was excited that he would have a man to take over the business, but I disappointed him by being anaphylactic to bee stings. .... Something about him having too much poison in his system when I was hatched, I gather, but am not sure. I dont’ believe my sisters are anaphylacitic though. I love my honey, and have to have it every morning. Maybe honey is why I am usually so healthy.

At any rate, I am pleased to see someone looking after the honey bees, and I wish you all the best in your newest venture. Enjoy the honey. Baking with honey is fun too, and healthier.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1689 posts in 2245 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 325 days ago

Oh I’m sure I’ll enjoy it for some time to come. Especially if I get into doing swarm calls or whatnot. This is fun, but the price on a 3lb package of bees is a bit much. Free is always better, IMO. :)

My endgame is to have 5 hives on property and perhaps more elsewhere at a few close acquaintances. Will see how that all pans out though.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14622 posts in 2473 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 324 days ago

look at you!!!! Wonderful.

to embed a video you have to choose the “old version” option on youtube.
so click “share” then “embed” and then the “use old embed code” option

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View jroot's profile

jroot

4989 posts in 2103 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 324 days ago

Catching swarms is always good. My father was frequently called to catch swarms. He also watched his hives and could determine if the colony was getting too big. He would then create his own queen cells and the bees would do there thing and soon there would be a new queen for a split hive. Lots of fun for him.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14622 posts in 2473 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 324 days ago

I often wondered how a new queen bee was discovered/saved/created ..

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1689 posts in 2245 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 324 days ago

In the event that the queen is ever killed or leaves with a swarm, the bees left behind can make a new queen out of the larva left. They simply take it and place it into a queen cup (looks like a peanut on the comb) and feed it royal jelly. Poof, a worker/nurse bee/etc larva turns into a queen.

You can force them to make queens fairly easily by doing splits. 3 bars of brood, 2 honey, shake in at least 2lb of bees on that and you’ll have a very grumpy new queenless hive. They’ll go “ACK!” and start pulling larva to make new queens. Strongest of however many they produce wins, rest are killed.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14622 posts in 2473 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 324 days ago

fascinating

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Tony 's profile

Tony

48 posts in 458 days
hardiness zone 9a

posted 320 days ago

I would love to have a few of those bees.

I have not seen one honey bee on any of my plants so far. My squash and cucumbers are not producing at all but the plants look great with many flowers. The yellow squash is rotting at the ends and the baby cucumbers are don’t grow. They turn yellow and fall of the vine. I’m no trying hand pollination. :(

My tomato plants are all making many tomatoes ok and the peppers are doing ok too.

Now I know where all the bees are!
Nice work!

-- Type-0's are normal for me! St Augustine Florida

View Harold and Pam's profile

Harold and Pam

253 posts in 1548 days
hardiness zone 10b

posted 300 days ago

So what got you into to this sort of thing? I’m allergic to wasp, not sure about bees, but don’t think I want to find out. So how many times have you been stung so far?

Good Luck.

-- Pam grows 'em - I cook 'em...... Melbourne, Fl

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4251 posts in 1736 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 299 days ago

Nice to see that you have expanded into honey bees, Scott. I just read a news article about a landscaping company in Oregon that sprayed dinotefuran on some blooming linden trees that resulted in the death of an estimated 25,000 bees. It seems the company employees didn’t follow the directions, with disastrous results. Even when pesticide users do follow the directions; however, the neonicotinoids are absorbed by the plant and remain as a toxin for the bees. Good luck with your bees, Scott, may they find only pesticide-free blooms.

When I was young, my father caught bee swarms. He maintained hives all over the valley. I have many fond memories of watching him working with his bees. I remember riding in the car with a swarm of bees in the trunk of our car after successful swarm captures. One time we stopped at a rest area and another motorist, with great concern, pointed out that our car (filled with young children) had bees coming in and out of the window! It was so normal to us, we didn’t even question it and we never were stung in the relocating process.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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