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Our First Onion

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Project by Harold and Pam posted 03-27-2013 12:43 AM 1200 views 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Pam has planted onions in the past and we end up with scallions instead. This time they actually developed into full size onions, and we are excited!! She has about another 8 in the ground that are about this size and then about 12 in another area that, while not scallion sized they are not developing as nicely as these have in this bed. Next year we plan to dedicate a whole bed to onions!

-- Pam grows 'em - I cook 'em...... Melbourne, Fl



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Harold and Pam

253 posts in 1735 days
hardiness zone 10b

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15 comments so far

View coloradogirl's profile

coloradogirl

23 posts in 1592 days
hardiness zone 4b

posted 03-27-2013 01:54 AM

Wow! I am so jealous. Look at those big, fat, tasty onions. Good job you two!

-- coloradogirl---SW Colorado, 7,000' elevation, zone 4,

View Harold and Pam's profile

Harold and Pam

253 posts in 1735 days
hardiness zone 10b

posted 03-27-2013 02:07 AM

Oh yea! We brought them in and slapped them on a freshly grilled burger and toasted buns, too boot!!

-- Pam grows 'em - I cook 'em...... Melbourne, Fl

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14683 posts in 2661 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 03-27-2013 10:08 AM

and what do you think has made the difference?

I haven’t had good onions in a few years

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View mrtoasty's profile

mrtoasty

2 posts in 577 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 03-27-2013 11:51 AM

Good morning all,

Go to this web site,

http://www.dixondalefarms.com/onionguide

These people will have you growing onions like you won’t believe. Several things to help.

1. Plant only onion plants, not sets, unless you want the early green onions as I call them.

2. Plant only an inch or so deep, when they begin to bulb pull the dirt away from the bulb down almost to the roots. I like to put a little straw around them as well.

3. Check the web site to make sure you have the correct day length variety. Debbie, you would use a long day variety I think.

Enjoy

Les

-- We die a little everyday, bring your garden to life.

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14683 posts in 2661 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 03-27-2013 12:18 PM

thanks MrT!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View jroot's profile

jroot

5067 posts in 2291 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 03-27-2013 12:19 PM

A wealth of information here. Thanks, Les.

-- jroot ....... Southern Ontario .......... grow zone 5A ...................."Gardening is an exercise in optimism." ....... . . Author Unknown

View sharad's profile

sharad

1639 posts in 1878 days
hardiness zone 11

posted 03-27-2013 05:26 PM

Glad to see you got such healthy onions this time. I am puzzled why they are not developing in some area.

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View Harold and Pam's profile

Harold and Pam

253 posts in 1735 days
hardiness zone 10b

posted 03-28-2013 12:25 AM

Les – thanks for the info. I’ll have to have “the Mrs ” check that out. I’d like to see us raise a load next season as we tend to eat a lot of onions.

Deb and Sharad – As for why this year and not in the past… I’ve not a clue. However the difference between the two beds this year we think is location. The bed where the onions are more like scallions is shaded.

-- Pam grows 'em - I cook 'em...... Melbourne, Fl

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14683 posts in 2661 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 03-28-2013 01:15 AM

then perhaps Mr. Sun is the answer.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Harold and Pam's profile

Harold and Pam

253 posts in 1735 days
hardiness zone 10b

posted 03-28-2013 02:07 AM

Yep, I’m sure “Mr Sun” had a lot to do with it. That and watering. If all goes well this year, Pam plans to claim more of the yard for gardening. If this comes together it will look someing like this:

This will be on our back/side yard where we have our shed and compst bin. This will add 6 raised beds of varying size to the garden. Plus this area is in the sun most of the day. If all goes as plans, in addition to the beds will be a chicken coop.

So Pam get a new garden and I get to play with power tools and make saw dust. Sounds like another project will be posted to Lumber Jocks!

-- Pam grows 'em - I cook 'em...... Melbourne, Fl

View justjoel's profile

justjoel

1063 posts in 2041 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 03-28-2013 02:12 AM

Nice onions – great garden lay-out. I’ve got onions and leeks started from seed – so we’ll see.

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4305 posts in 1923 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 03-28-2013 11:00 AM

Harold and Pam – Your onions are so large and they look delicious. I know you will create some wonderful meals with them. Also, your garden plan looks great; I see lots of growing space for Pam. I am happy you are getting chickens! I hope you enjoy having them as much as we do. Which direction is north? If that little house in the upper right will be your chicken coop, will it get some shade in the afternoon? Hot summers can be very tough on chickens, even chickens that are bred for warm climates. If it is in full afternoon sun, consider planting something next to it that will cast shade over the roof. Otherwise, your placement of the coop looks sound. I have learned from experience that it reduces work to have the compost pile close to the chicken coop. Will your chickens be free ranging? If so, think about how you will protect the seedlings and young plants. Chickens can easily dig these up when they are looking for insects. Once plants are established, I have found a few chickens don’t do as much harm.

I began growing onions from plants rather than sets last year and my onion crop was the best ever. My neighbor planted sets and plants and reported that the plants produced much larger onions. As a result, I am going with plants now rather than sets. Joel, starting from seed is the best way to go if you have the space and you start early enough.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View CampD's profile

CampD

56 posts in 1059 days
hardiness zone 4b

posted 03-28-2013 12:12 PM

I am so jealous,
I still have 2’ of snow covering my onions and garlic!

View Harold and Pam's profile

Harold and Pam

253 posts in 1735 days
hardiness zone 10b

posted 04-02-2013 01:45 AM

CampD – You should check out florida. Our snows been gone for sometime now!!!

Robin – thanks for the info on the chickens. I did not know any of that. so why do you suggest having the coop and the compost near each other? Our compost bin is behind the shed – so rather close.

-- Pam grows 'em - I cook 'em...... Melbourne, Fl

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4305 posts in 1923 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 04-02-2013 11:35 AM

Harold – I was just thinking about controlling the level of work required in your system. In the winter, we use the deep litter method in the coop, allowing carbon (wood chips) and chicken wastes to compost inside the coop. It gives the chickens material to scratch, controls smell and begins to create a wonderful compost for the spring garden. When I move the chickens out into the pasture in the spring, I put the litter into the compost pile to finish breaking down before I move it into the garden; so I appreciate having the coop close to both. Unless it has enough time to break down, chicken manure is generally too strong to use directly in your garden.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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