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Some Impact Man #14: Peak Phosphorus, Peak Potassium: Peak Fertilizer- Learn to compost or perish

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Blog entry by daltxguy posted 12-04-2012 03:33 PM 3726 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 13: The Man Who Planted Trees Part 14 of Some Impact Man series Part 15: Green houses for cold climates - 4 different ideas »

Are We Heading Toward Peak Fertilizer?
—By Tom Philpott| Wed Nov. 28, 2012 3:03 AM PST
91
http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2012/11/are-we-heading-toward-peak-fertilizer

You’ve heard of peak oil—the idea that the globe’s easy-to-get-to petroleum reserves are largely cashed, and most of what’s left is the hard stuff, buried in deep-sea deposits or tar sands. But what about peak phosphorus and potassium? These elements form two-thirds of the holy agricultural triumvirate of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (also known as NPK, from their respective markers in the periodic table). These nutrients, which are essential for plants to grow, are extracted from soil every time we harvest crops, and have to be replaced if farmland is to remain productive.

For most of agricultural history, successful farming has been about figuring out how to recycle these elements (although no one had identified them until the 19th century). That meant returning food waste, animal waste, and in some cases, human waste to the soil. Early in the 20th century, we learned to mass produce N, P, and K—giving rise to the modern concept of fertilizer, and what’s now known as industrial agriculture.

The N in NPK, nitrogen, can literally be synthesized from thin air, through a process developed in the early 20th century by the German chemist Fritz Haber. Our reliance on synthetic nitrogen fertilizer (as its known) carries its own vast array of problems—not least of which that making it requires an enormous amount of fossil energy. (I examined the dilemmas of synthetic N in a 2011 series at Grist.) But phosphorus and potassium cannot be synthesized—they’re found in significant amounts only in a few large deposits scattered across the planet, in the form, respectively, of phosphate rock and potash. After less than a century of industrial ag, we’re starting to burn through them. In a column in the November 14 Nature, the legendary investor Jeremy Grantham lays out why that’s a problem:

These two elements cannot be made, cannot be substituted, are necessary to grow all life forms, and are mined and depleted. It’s a scary set of statements. Former Soviet states and Canada have more than 70% of the potash. Morocco has 85% of all high-grade phosphates. It is the most important quasi-monopoly in economic history.

What happens when these fertilizers run out is a question I can’t get satisfactorily answered and, believe me, I have tried. There seems to be only one conclusion: their use must be drastically reduced in the next 20-40 years or we will begin to starve.

Why listen to this guy? Grantham, cofounder and chief strategist for the Boston firm Grantham Mayo Van Otterloo, has avoided or at least foreseen every bubble from the Japanese equity/real estate craze of the ‘80s right up to our own real estate mania of the 2000s. Back in fall 2007, with the S&P 500 near all-time highs and months before the Bear Stearns nosedive, Grantham was publicly foretelling financial gloom and doom.

Grantham is also known for his real talk on climate change. The Nature piece I quoted focuses on that topic, and advises scientists to “be arrested (if necessary),” in order to inspire policy action on the climate crisis. And in a characteristically blunt November letter to his firm’s investors, Grantham argued that “we should not unnecessarily ruin a pleasant and currently very serviceable planet just to maximize the short-term profits of energy companies and others.” That’s more clearly stated than you’ll get from any high-profile Democratic pol—and this from a financial titan, no less.

The next time someone facilely insists that the “industrial farms are the future,” ask what the plan is regarding phosphorus.
So, given his record of prescience and gift for getting to the heart of the matter, we should probably listen to Grantham when he says that our agricultural system is lurching toward collapse.

Of the two key fertilizers Grantham warns about, phosphorus is the more urgent. As Grantham notes, our friendly neighbor Canada sits on a vast potash stash. But phosphate rock is largely concentrated in Morocco—and not just anywhere in Morocco. It’s in the country’s Western Sahara region, on highly disputed land. In a superb 2011 piece in Yale Environment 360, the environmental writer Fred Pearce explained:

The Western Sahara is an occupied territory. In 1976, when Spanish colonialists left, its neighbor Morocco invaded, and has held it ever since. Most observers believe the vast phosphate deposits were the major reason that Morocco took an interest. Whatever the truth, the Polisario Front, a rebel movement the UN recognizes as the rightful representatives of the territory, would like it back.

Given that a savvy investor like Grantham calls Morocco’s phosphate holdings “the most important quasi-monopoly in economic history,” you can bet that the Polisario Front isn’t going to let the Moroccan government control it without a fight. In other words, a scarce mineral key to the future of industrial agriculture is concentrated on geopolitically fraught territory. As Pearce puts it, “If the people of Western Sahara ever resume their war to get their country back—or if the Arab Spring spreads and Morocco goes the way of Libya—then we may be adding phosphate fertilizer to the list of finite resources, such as water and land, that are constraining world food supplies sooner than we think.”

Yet something tells me that peak phosphorus will continue to be an obscure topic. I’ve been writing about it since 2008 (see here, here, here, and here). Foreign Policy ran a major piece on it in 2010; 2011 brought Pearce’s article as well as a profile of Grantham in no less a forum than the New York Times Magazine, in which he talked up peak phosphorus at length. Even after all of that, I can think of few crucial issues as far from the center of public conversation than the phosphorus shortage. We’ve haven’t really begun to face the problem of climate change; our reliance on mined phosphorus doesn’t register at all. It’s easy to ignore crises whose most dire consequences loom decades away.

But the next time someone facilely insists that the “industrial farms are the future,” ask what the plan is regarding phosphorus. Developing an agriculture that’s ready for a phosphorus shortage means a massive focus on recycling the nutrients we take from the soil back into the soil—in other words, composting, not on a backyard level but rather on a society-wide scale. It also requires policies that give farmers incentives to build up organic matter in soil, so it holds in nutrients instead of letting them leach away (another massive problem stemming from our reliance on abundant NPK). Both of these solutions, of course, are specialties of organic agriculture.

Also

Jeremy Grantham Warns Of No Safety Margin From This Collapse
November 26, 2012
” if we don’t reduce our usage over the next 20 to 40 years, we’ll starve.

http://seekingalpha.com/article/1027951-jeremy-grantham-warns-of-no-safety-margin-from-this-collapse

For his ability to move markets and shape ideas and policies, Bloomberg added GMO’s Jeremy Grantham to its 50 Most Influential list. Grantham predicted bubbles in Japanese stocks in 1989 and U.S. stocks in 2000, and risk assets in 2007.

<snip>

Grantham fears many things heading into next year, but commodity scarcity tops his list.

The prices of raw materials are accelerating higher. Nearly every commodity has tripled in value since 2002. Though the ascent has been parabolic, Grantham doesn’t believe it’s a bubble … and that’s what worries him. He believes that commodity prices are going higher because we’re running out. He claims the biggest danger to our society will be food prices and food costs. He also noted that growth in the productivity of grains has fallen to 1.2% per year. This rate exactly matches population growth, leaving society with no safety margin.

However, the rise in food costs and decline in crop growth isn’t Grantham’s biggest long-term worry. Grantham is distressed most about a coming shortage of two fertilizers: phosphorus and potassium. Fertilizer supplies are dwindling rapidly. And farmers are more reliant than ever on fertilizer to replenish crop soil.

Potassium and phosphorus are necessary to grow crops and livestock. Moreover, phosphorus and potassium occur exclusively in nature. We cannot manufacture them. Once the supply is gone, it’s gone forever.

It’s clear we need these commodities in order to survive. And we appear to have no replacements. Despite Grantham’s more than $99 billion in assets, he can’t get an answer from anyone about what happens when we run out. He claims to have received only one conclusion – if we don’t reduce our usage over the next 20 to 40 years, we’ll starve.

This is nothing new, though. Grantham has been concerned about food scarcity for years, so it’s logical that he’s bullish on investments in natural resources. He advises targeting a 30% allocation to resources, with 15% in forestry, 5% in efficiency investments and 10% in “stuff in the ground.”

Some of his prominent stakes at GMO include Exxon Mobile (NYSE: XOM), Vale S.A. (NYSE: VALE) and Canadian Natural Resources (NYSE: CNQ).

-- Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. - Thoreau



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daltxguy

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15 comments so far

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3727 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 12-04-2012 05:56 PM

sometimes you just want to cover your eyes and ears and not know all of this stuff.

Manures, green and otherwise, are definitely the way to go, huh?

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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daltxguy

882 posts in 2825 days
hardiness zone 4a

posted 12-05-2012 11:12 AM

Sure, we don’t want to hear this but ignoring this doesn’t make it any less true.
We can ignore it but don’t be surprised as the price of food continues to increase forever or suddenly skyrockets Since we’ve managed to find enough fossil fuels to annihilate humankind, this is the more likely reason that food will become only for the rich. The rest of us will starve and die – unless you grow your own.

The people reading this are likely much better prepared already as we know the value of good soil.

Btw, phosphorous might be a easy one to solve, but we have to shift from mining it to recycling urine. Minerals never ‘go away’, they just change location. Humanure will also have to be a realistic form of fertilizer. We have to get over the idea that somehow human waste is different from any other animal.

-- Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. - Thoreau

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3727 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 12-05-2012 11:33 AM

I should be thankful for all of those rabbits jumping around my yard eating my plants … all that fertilizer that they leave behind :)

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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daltxguy

882 posts in 2825 days
hardiness zone 4a

posted 12-05-2012 05:02 PM

In fact, yes!

Plant enough for the rabbits and you. Grow more with rabbit poo and harvest some of the rabbits once in a while. Everybody wins ( except for the short life of some rabbits). I want to see rabbits in your canning jars next year! (Not to mention some nice rabbit fur hats and mittens)

Joking aside, this is a vital concept of permaculture. The problem is the solution. You must use what you have to increase yields in cooperation with the natural cycles around you. Working with it, not against it.

Sepp Holzer believes that if it has to be managed, then it is the wrong system and unsustainable.
For example, stop trimming your fruit trees, giving the browsers something to feed on other than your vegetables!

-- Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. - Thoreau

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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3727 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 12-06-2012 01:28 AM

the wildlife gets lots to eat around here … except inside my three fenced in areas or I would get nothing from the garden. Did that one year when the rabbits took over.
I think I have a nice balance now.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 2990 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 12-07-2012 01:52 PM

I am smiling at the image of jars and jars of canned rabbit from the vegetable garden. Talk about eating local!

: )

Excellent topic, Daltxguy. It isn’t only the supply of clean water, fossil fuels and topsoil that is threatened by the current agricultural practices in the majority of our food growing systems. I am thankful for my goats and chickens and all the wildlife I am able to attract, even if it means having to share some of my harvest.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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justjoel

1063 posts in 3108 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 12-13-2012 10:43 AM

I’m going to share this on my Facebook page. I’ve many friends who pay attention to these topics too. Thanks for sharing.

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

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sharad

1671 posts in 2944 days
hardiness zone 11

posted 12-16-2012 10:12 PM

Thank you Daltxguy for enlightening us on this important subject and the challenges we face. I will take composting more seriously now even for my tiny terrace garden. I have recently kept a beehive in my garden and a few days back found about 200 dead bees (mostly the males). Instead of tossing them in the dustbin I buried them in one of my containers. I hope I have done a wise act.

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

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daltxguy

882 posts in 2825 days
hardiness zone 4a

posted 12-17-2012 06:36 AM

Should be fine Sharad. When I first learned how to compost, I was told that anything which was once living will compost.

Why did the bees die? A natural occurrence?

-- Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. - Thoreau

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 2990 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 12-17-2012 10:32 AM

Congratulations on your new bees. Sharad. I would like to hear more about your bees, including where and how you are keeping them. Thanks!

Daltxguy, it is natural for the female working bees in the hive to kick the male drones out of the hive before the winter. The only useful role of the male bee is to mate with the queen. Before winter, or when food resources are scarce, female bees will kick the males out of the hive to conserve food stores. Sharad, I hope it was just the normal hive preparations for winter and not due to something adverse.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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daltxguy

882 posts in 2825 days
hardiness zone 4a

posted 12-17-2012 10:58 AM

Sometimes I feel like a bee…

-- Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. - Thoreau

View justjoel's profile

justjoel

1063 posts in 3108 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 12-17-2012 11:02 AM

Don’t get me buzz’n on that subject! :)

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

View sharad's profile

sharad

1671 posts in 2944 days
hardiness zone 11

posted 12-17-2012 04:54 PM

Daltxguy, Radicalfarmergal has given the answer to your question. I will post a picture of the hive and keep you in touch about the progress.

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

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sharad

1671 posts in 2944 days
hardiness zone 11

posted 12-17-2012 10:00 PM

Here is the picture of the beehive and one showing the entrance for the bees.

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 2990 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 12-19-2012 04:39 AM

Thanks for the photos, Sharad. Good luck with those bees!

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

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