GardenTenders

Growing My Way to Freedom #41: Fruit from the Gardens on the Summer Solstice

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Radicalfarmergal posted 06-24-2013 02:43 PM 1299 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 40: Asparagus Pea (Tetragonolobus Purpureus) Part 41 of Growing My Way to Freedom series Part 42: Vegetables in the Garden on the Summer Solstice »

Our gardens are reaching their peak of productivity. Everywhere I look, plants are converting the sun’s energy and the abundant rains into delicious, healthy food. We have never had such an abundant year. In addition to the weather, I think the soil has much to do with our success. When I dig down under the mulch, I come away with handfuls of beautiful soil. We are seeing more animals in the garden. (I hope the birds leave enough cherries for us!) We have had so many strawberries, my sons don’t even want to eat them anymore. I made 16 pints of strawberry jam and I could make more. I have been giving them away as gifts as well because we will not eat that much strawberry jam in one year. Enjoy the photos. I wish you could see the gardens in person.

Strawberries….we are picking at least two full colanders of strawberries every day.

Here are a few ripe strawberries, ready to be picked, growing on the hugelkultur mound.

The cherries are getting ripe too, both on the tree and bushes. Perhaps tomorrow morning they will be ready to harvest to make a cherry pie. If I get enough, I will preserve them for future pies as well.

The goumi bushes are also loaded with their wonderfully tart fruit. We have been eating them by the handfuls and sharing them with the birds.

The currant bushes are covered and the fruit will be ready for jelly any day now.

The black raspberries are not too far behind….

These are peaches growing on one of the trees my sons started from a pit. This is its first year with fruit and we are excited to see how they taste.

And then there will be blueberries….

And lots and lots of apples….

I could post photos of the potatoes, tomatoes, peas, corn, beans and so many other fruit but I will leave it for another entry. Nature is bountiful and I am very, very thankful.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout



View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4300 posts in 1885 days
hardiness zone 5b

Entry tags/keywords

zone 5 perennial

View Blog Archive
Subscribe to blog entries (RSS)


By subscribing to the RSS feed you will be notified when new entries are posted on this blog.


13 comments so far

View Tom's profile

Tom

21 posts in 1631 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-24-2013 02:46 PM

Wow! Thanks for sharing. Your garden is an inspiration to me. It looks wonderful.

-- If you are lucky enough to find a way of life you love, you have to find the courage to live it--John Irving

View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3807 posts in 2252 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 06-24-2013 03:30 PM

Wonderful, wonderful, Robin. You have worked so hard and your gardens are certainly rewarding you.

Wish I was there! :D

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4300 posts in 1885 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-24-2013 03:33 PM

Thank you, Tom and Iris. Other than spending time with my family and friends, my favorite place to be is in my garden. It satisfies me in so many ways. Iris, you are so welcome to come visit when you feel up to traveling again. : )

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View DS's profile

DS

22 posts in 564 days
hardiness zone 9

posted 06-24-2013 05:10 PM

I am in awe of your success. I have strawberrries for the first time ever this year. they are sweet, but they are tiny.
The grape vines are also producing for the first time this year and they also are sweet, but tiny.

This morning, my wife quipped that she wonders if the cantelopes we are sprouting right now will also be tiny.

There’s something very rewarding about eating the food that you grew yourself. It’s hard to describe.
Your pictures make me want to go plant a Cherry tree! Thanks for sharing!

View justjoel's profile

justjoel

1063 posts in 2002 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 06-24-2013 06:32 PM

So, is that house down the street still up for sale? I mean, looks like you’ll need some help bringing in the harvests.

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

View quicksilver's profile

quicksilver

29 posts in 510 days
hardiness zone 7

posted 06-24-2013 07:19 PM

hmmmmm….raspberries

-- Quicksilver

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14682 posts in 2622 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-25-2013 12:54 AM

fantastic crop-—- the proof of your gardening skills!
You must be kept busy with the picking and the preserving!

My cherries are about ready to can and I’m busy for the next three days ..

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Harold and Pam's profile

Harold and Pam

253 posts in 1697 days
hardiness zone 10b

posted 06-25-2013 03:54 AM

Someday I promise I’m coming up to visit – need to see your gardens and your hubby’s work shop. In the mean time – you can send down some of that wonderful jam to Florida!!

-- Pam grows 'em - I cook 'em...... Melbourne, Fl

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4300 posts in 1885 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-25-2013 11:17 AM

DS, I agree. It feels wonderful to be able to feed my family the foods that we grow ourselves. If you give them the conditions they prefer, your grapes and strawberries will provide you with delicious fruit for years to come. Diminutive cantaloupes…..there might really be a market for that! Over the years, I have taken strawberry runners and relocated new plants all over my gardens as a green ground cover to protect the soil and the result has been an abundance of strawberries. This is the first year we have had any measurable harvest from our bush cherries. We tasted a few yesterday and they were much sweeter than the cherries from our tree.

Joel, it is indeed still up for sale and the price has dropped to $65,000, but I think only a person with extensive construction skills should buy it. A neighbor, who regularly fixes up house for resale, looked into the house and his assessment was that he wasn’t sure that he would take it even if someone offered it to him for free. I guess there are serious issues with mold, the foundation and the septic. His professional assessment was that it should just be torn down. Too bad for me, I could definitely use your (and Sofie’s!) company, help and creativity.

Quicksilver, raspberries are such an easy fruit, at least here in Massachusetts. The black raspberries are first, then red and finally we enjoy the golden raspberries at the end of the summer. They are such a quickly rewarding fruit. You have room for a raspberry patch in your garden. All you have to do is plant a few canes…..

Debbie, I can’t take too much credit for successful harvests because I have had too many examples of unsuccessful harvests and that would imply I don’t have many gardening skills…. : ) My plants are more established now and I am getting better at observing and working with nature and I do think those factors help. I hope your cherries wait for you or that you can enlist some help to get to the harvest.

Harold, you and Pam can grow so many cool fruit trees and plants down in Florida. Maybe we can establish a fruit swap? : ) Did you get your chickens yet?

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14682 posts in 2622 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-25-2013 12:02 PM

I think your UN-successful harvests transformed into having successful ones is a perfect example of your skills!!!

re: my cherries, since I have never had a successful year before I don’t know how long they will wait…. they have just now started turning red. Many are still in the yellow-red stage but I’m sure they will be fully ripe fast. And then of course the birds will be diving in for their share.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View justjoel's profile

justjoel

1063 posts in 2002 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 06-25-2013 10:31 PM

Well, Robin, I do have a tent! And Sofie loves camping! Hmmmmm

-- "We are stardust. We are golden. And we've got to get ourselves back to the garden." Joni Mitchell

View sharad's profile

sharad

1633 posts in 1839 days
hardiness zone 11

posted 06-26-2013 01:00 AM

What a great success, Robin! As you sow so shall you reap. I wish I get chance to visit your garden to taste various jams and jellies.

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4300 posts in 1885 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-27-2013 01:11 AM

Thank you for your support, MsDebbie. : ) We picked all the ripe cherries today but there are many more almost-ripe cherries on the bushes. Starting with an almost full colander of fruit, after removing the seeds, I ended up with about two cups of cherries for a pie because the pits are so large in relation to the total fruit. They taste really good, though, not too tart but definitely not very sweet. It is hard not to just eat them right from the bush. I definitely won’t be trying to preserve them. We will just enjoy them this summer.

Justjoel, sounds like a fun plan. I imagine Sofie will like to see all the fireflies we have this time of year. I never saw them growing up in the desert; they enchant me still. Poot and Gnorman might want to come along too. : )

Thank you, Sharad. I try to limit the amount of sugar we consume, but our jams and jellies do make a wonderful treat to remind us of summer all year long.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: All views and comments posted by members are not necessarily those of GardenTenders.com or of those working on the site.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

LumberJocks.com :: woodworking showcase

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com