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2012 War On Bindweed #2: Strategy #99

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Blog entry by MsDebbieP posted 06-06-2012 08:26 AM 4082 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: The Bindweed Battle Part 999 Part 2 of 2012 War On Bindweed series no next part

6/6/12

An update on my war against bindweed.

Bindweed: a highly invasive, plant climbing/smothering, non-native curse.
Past Battles: pulling, digging, covering, mulching, chemical warfare, cursing, crying, begging…

Current Score: Bindweed 98 – Debbie 0

Strategy #99
Well, I did the round-up strategy with a couple of plants (immersing the live vines in a container of round-up and letting them suck it up, taking it deep down into the root system) and now, hopefully, it is busy doing its thing below the surface. (My apologies to the earth, the creatures and the other plants in the area.)

While I wait on that, I came up with strategy #99. Reflecting back on those mile long roots that were found underneath our pool when we took it down each fall, I thought, “Hmm.. what if ….”

What if:
  • 1) I cover the area with a tarp,
  • 2) let the roots do their thing, crawling underneath trying to find daylight, and
  • 3) throughout the summer, keep cutting the roots off so they never reach sunlight.
    Will they shrivel and die?”

I had already dug up and removed all of my flowers/shrubs from the area. So it was just a matter of spreading out a tarp and placing rocks on top to hold it in place. Now I wait. I think I’ll check it once a week.

Doubt #1
There are all the shoots, from the same root systems, that are heading in the other direction that WILL get sunlight. So will I really be accomplishing anything?
Doubt #2
The plants were covered for five months in the past and it didn’t fizz on the root system. Will the continued cutting make a difference?

Strategy #98.5
Also, yesterday afternoon and this morning I cut the bindweed vines from my strawberry/flower patch area next to the Cabin.
Although the task itself wasn’t terribly difficult, my hips and back did NOT like the process. It took me about three hours to complete, including break times.
In the picture below you can see the garbage bags of bindweed that I took from the small area.

In this pix, the “picked area” is on the left and the (obviously) tarped area is on the right. There are still lots of bindweed growing in the pathway between and in the vinca patch on the lower right. Vinca and bindweed have similar characteristics (in appearance) and pulling a vine out of a vine is agonizing! Needless to say, it is yet to be tackled.

On the other side of the fence (to the right of the tarps) there is lots of bindweed growing up through the straw mulch.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)



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MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3880 days
hardiness zone 5b

gardening is a journey, a journey of learning how to connect with and support Mother Nature

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12 comments so far

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

882 posts in 2977 days
hardiness zone 4a

posted 06-06-2012 09:08 AM

Have you thought about moving?

-- Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. - Thoreau

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3880 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-06-2012 09:49 AM

that was Strategy 41 .. but I decided against it. :D

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View mmh's profile

mmh

332 posts in 3409 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 06-06-2012 08:22 PM

Do geese or goats eat bindweed????

-- A weed is a plant that is growing where it was not purposefully placed by human hands.

View mmh's profile

mmh

332 posts in 3409 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 06-06-2012 08:23 PM

The roots run deep and are quite brittle, so it’s best to try to gently fork them out several days after a heavy rain when the soil is very soft, but not mushy.

-- A weed is a plant that is growing where it was not purposefully placed by human hands.

View bucheron's profile

bucheron

14 posts in 2117 days
hardiness zone 4a

posted 06-07-2012 06:33 PM

I guess some wars are worth fighting. Soldier on…

-- Lose your mind and come to your senses!

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3880 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-08-2012 02:41 AM

thanks, Bucheron … I haven’t given up.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Bon's profile

Bon

7374 posts in 3660 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 06-08-2012 07:09 AM

There used to be a place near here where the bindweed grew along the boulavards.I noticed that it isn’t growing there anymore.I wonder if that new liquid road salt the township is using now got rid of it.Just wondering.

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3880 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 06-08-2012 07:14 AM

hmmm worth pondering!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3143 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 09-06-2012 05:42 PM

Debbie,

I noticed a new wild vine growing along the goat fence today and my first thought was, “Oh no! the dreaded bindweed!” I raced inside to check images of bindweed to see if I was indeed being infested and I found this delightful site. Warning, it contains photos of your nemesis but I think the artist in you will still find it beautiful and fascinating. I hope these photographs bring you pleasure, not irritation. : )

A close-up view of the wildflower Field Bindweed?http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/artfeb10/bj-fieldbindweed.html

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3880 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 09-07-2012 02:23 AM

The cumbrous bind-weed, with its wreaths and bells,
Had twined about her two small rows of peas,
And dragged them to the earth.

From “The Excursion” by William Wordsworth
——————

Mr. Wordsworth knows of the horrors of bindweed!!
I also found it interesting that the photographer calls it Creeping Jenny. I wonder how many different plants have been given the nickname “Creeping Jenny”? I have seen it mentioned for some other plant and the beautiful yellow ground cover that I have in my yard was tagged as “Creeping Jenny” when I purchased it.

Now .. the photography – lovely.
The plant is pretty. The flowers are so delicate. The sneaky little devil!!

I am assuming that this is NOT what you have in your yard.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4312 posts in 3143 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 09-07-2012 04:11 AM

Thankfully, it does not appear to be bindweed. The leaves are much rounder, less like a triangle. There are no blooms yet so I am not sure what it is, but it has been growing very, very fast. I think it is telling me to work on filling my vertical layer. : )

I am glad you enjoyed the photos.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3880 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 09-07-2012 04:21 AM

thank goodness it wasn’t bindweed that you found… phew.

yes, the bindweed is a pretty little thing and the photographer took some great shots.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

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