GardenTenders

Did 'Sandy' Blow these Beauties to My Backyard?

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Iris43 posted 11-03-2012 03:19 AM 1895 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I was thrilled to see these strange, exotic birds visiting my feeders. This is the first time at my feeders and the first time I had seen these birders anywhere.

I hope you enjoy seeing these pictures…....maybe they’ll visit you too!

Photobucket

When I first spotted them, I thought, “Goldfinches?”. But those large white patches seen on the back of the males wings just glowed! And I knew I had to find out who these new visitors were. They had the large beak of the grosbeaks and they were a similar size.

Sure enough, looking in my ‘Golden Field Guide’, Birds of North America, I found ‘Evening Grosbeaks’. Here are some more pics.

2012 evening grosbeak

The female (standing in the center of the photo) is not as brightly coloured as the male but has a beauty of her own.

Photobucket

The large white flashes on the male’s wings is very obvious, as is the yellow bar over the top of their beaks.

Photobucket

The grosbeaks were very noisey as they squabbled and gobbled at the feeders. They pushed each other off the feeders and were generally bad mannered with each other. However, when they returned the next day they were the ones pushed aside as a large flock of bluejays took over the feeders. They sat quietly high in the birch trees, waiting for the jays to move on.

Photobucket
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Photobucket

Even a red-bellied woodpecker came to check out why all the excitement…..

Photobucket

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'



View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3808 posts in 2289 days
hardiness zone 5a

Entry tags/keywords

birds in the garden zone 5 november

View Blog Archive
Subscribe to blog entries (RSS)


By subscribing to the RSS feed you will be notified when new entries are posted on this blog.

Recent Entries


8 comments so far

View sharad's profile

sharad

1639 posts in 1876 days
hardiness zone 11

posted 11-03-2012 07:43 AM

Iris, you have captured beautiful pictures of the birds and your narration is so nice as if the bird feeder is in front of me. At what height is your bird feeder from the ground and what do you keep in the feeders for the birds. I want to try keeping a bird feeder on my terrace hence the questions.

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14683 posts in 2659 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 11-03-2012 09:45 AM

well isn’t that fascinating!

I guess I should fill up my feeder and see what happens.

Beautiful birds … and beautiful photos!
I’m glad you noticed and took photos.

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4305 posts in 1922 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 11-03-2012 12:04 PM

Isn’t it fun to discover a “new” visitor in your garden? Great detective work and thank you for taking those photos! I don’t think I have ever noticed an Evening Grosbeak in our gardens although we are lucky to get the little yellow goldfinches.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3808 posts in 2289 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 11-03-2012 02:17 PM

Sharad, thank you for your kind remarks. I get so excited when I ‘discover’ a new bird (or butterfly, or flower) in my yard that sometimes my pictures suffer from not being able to hold the camera still. LOL I take dozens of pictures and then I usually am able to find a few worthy of showing.

My feeders are all between 4-6 feet off the ground and near or under trees. Birds seem to prefer that height and I am able to easily reach the feeders to keep them clean and filled. They also like the nearby trees and bushes for hiding quickly if danger appears.

I had white safflower seed in the the feeders in the pictures which brings the cardinals to the feeders. My bird book stated that evening grosbeaks come to safflower seed and sunflower seed. When I refilled the feeders I included sunflower seed which might explain why the blue jays showed up the second day….and the red-bellied woodpecker.

I have several different types of feeders and seed, each to target a certain kind of bird. i.e. The silo feeders hold niger seed which brings flocks for goldfinches to my backyard.

Photobucket

MsDeb, I sent pics of the grosbeaks to my DD to alert her to watch for them at her feeders. She immediately let me know they had already been at her feeders the day bf Sandy blew through SW Ontario. So if your feeders are filled, it is all together possible they’ll visit you.

RFG, my birdbook shows Massachuetts well within the grosbeaks winter area, too. With your ‘wild’ area and pond nearby I think, you could entice all manner of wild birds to visit your feeders. A supply of water and the sound of running water will also encourage birds to spend time where you can observe them.

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

View sharad's profile

sharad

1639 posts in 1876 days
hardiness zone 11

posted 11-03-2012 04:15 PM

Thank you Iris for answering my questions to my satisfaction. I will think now how to keep bird feeders on my terrace. Bigger birds like pigeons and crows may pose some problems.

Sharad

-- Bagwan-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View Radicalfarmergal's profile

Radicalfarmergal

4305 posts in 1922 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 11-04-2012 12:18 AM

We might have had grosbeaks and I just thought they were finches from a distance. I often notice birds after I learn about them from a photo or an article. Knowing about them helps me recognize them. That is one of the reasons why I enjoy your posts so much!

The birds do appreciate the water and I think that is a main reason why we get so many beautiful birds. This autumn we had large flocks (several hundreds) of the red wing blackbirds pass overhead and the cedar waxwings are happily devouring our tiny crab apples and hawthorn berries on their trip south. We do have a barn cat that likes to catch songbirds when he is not catching rodents, so I try not to entice the birds too close to the house with a feeder. I just plant lots of berry-producing shrubs and trees to feed them and hope that they are clever and fast enough to escape our cat.

-- "...I have nothing against authorities as such; I am only in favor of putting a question mark after just about everything they say." Ruth Stout

View Harold and Pam's profile

Harold and Pam

253 posts in 1734 days
hardiness zone 10b

posted 11-04-2012 01:35 AM

WOw what wonderful photos you took. Pam will be so jealous. She tries like crazy to get birds in the yard and you simple have them “blown in!”

-- Pam grows 'em - I cook 'em...... Melbourne, Fl

View lavender22's profile

lavender22

85 posts in 612 days
hardiness zone 8a

posted 03-04-2013 10:48 PM

All I can say is beautiful:)

-- I love hostas:)

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: All views and comments posted by members are not necessarily those of GardenTenders.com or of those working on the site.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

LumberJocks.com :: woodworking showcase

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com