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Chickens #10: Roof, Roof!

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Blog entry by Scott Hildenbrand posted 05-02-2009 08:45 PM 7861 reads 0 times favorited 31 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Coop Sheeting Up Part 10 of Chickens series Part 11: More Coop Work »

Busted my butt (and smashed my finger, argh!) getting as much done in between the rain today. The loft storage areas are done and floored and I’ve got the bulk of the rafters up now.

I framed up the end overhang while I was at it so I could get the 24” OC marks in the right place.

This is the back loft. It’s lower than the front one. It will also be what holds up the roosts when I get that far, via chain or rope, or something.

The front loft area, up higher than the back. I don’t like feeling claustrophobic when I walk in the door so I bumped it up a bit.

I’m hoping to get the rest of the rafters done tomorrow so that I can start sheeting it ASAP.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b



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Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

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31 comments so far

View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3811 posts in 3323 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 05-02-2009 09:21 PM

Good job, Scott!! This looks fabulous. Your girls are going to be very happy when they get into their new home.

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

View GrandmaT's profile

GrandmaT

5389 posts in 3571 days
hardiness zone 9

posted 05-02-2009 10:17 PM

WOOHOO!!!!!!!! Man, look at that … a roof!!!! Gonna be one good looking coop when you are done!! :-)

-- "A beautiful garden is a work of heart" --

View mmh's profile

mmh

332 posts in 3222 days
hardiness zone 7a

posted 05-02-2009 10:39 PM

Hey, forget the chckens, this would make a wonderful art studio! The chickens can sleep under the bunk beds.

-- A weed is a plant that is growing where it was not purposefully placed by human hands.

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 05-02-2009 10:49 PM

If I was going that route, I’d have left the lofts out.. ;)

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View XploreOrganics's profile

XploreOrganics

1393 posts in 3572 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 05-03-2009 03:53 AM

Looking great!

-- Xploreorganics, 5b Canada, LFD 06-20 http://colorfulcanary.blogspot.com/

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3693 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 05-03-2009 05:17 AM

living at the ritz
I can see the birds fluffing up their feathers—Divas, indeed!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3811 posts in 3323 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 05-03-2009 05:43 AM

Yea, MsDeb. But we’ve seen pics of how Scott’s girls are going to look. They are going to deserve the Ritz! I don’t see how Scott could do any less for such a good-looking harem. :-)
Oh BTW Scott, sorry to hear about your smashed finger- – - The price of keeping such a high-class harem. 8^)

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

View GrandmaT's profile

GrandmaT

5389 posts in 3571 days
hardiness zone 9

posted 05-03-2009 07:11 AM

Ohhhhh, I love it … DIVA’s Harem … GREAT DESCRIPTION of those lovely “gals” Scott … thanks for the morning chuckle MsDeb and Iris!!!

-- "A beautiful garden is a work of heart" --

View Bon's profile

Bon

7374 posts in 3473 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 05-03-2009 08:12 AM

I am chuckling at this thread too .I am picturing Biker Chick as a diva. ha ha ha

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 05-03-2009 11:42 AM

Took 5 of the chickens out to the coop to play while I cleaned out the pine shavings in the brooder so I wouldn’t trip over all of them. They really seemed to enjoy it.

I’m going to cut the remaining rafters and get them ready to tack into place. Bit rainy today though so not sure if I’ll get more than that done.

I’m contemplating paneling the inside of the diva hut with luan. I’ve got several sheets on hand.. I also priced porch paint for the floor yesterday. A gallon of it will run me $23 or $25 for oil based. The rest of the inside will be painted in exterior white latex.

Be better looking and easier to clean if I panel it.. Not sure though if I will. Maybe later… Floor will be painted for sure, but holding off on the walls until I can decide for sure what I want to do.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View Iris43's profile

Iris43

3811 posts in 3323 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 05-03-2009 12:50 PM

I’ll bet they liked it! much more roomy than the brooder. They would be easy to trip over, they must be getting big and leggy…like teenagers.

-- 'To plant a Garden is to believe in Tomorrow'

View Everyman's profile

Everyman

16 posts in 3106 days
hardiness zone 8

posted 05-04-2009 06:13 AM

This is wonderful! I am so impressed – this would make a fine garden arbor for inclement days like today. Then you could add a few plants, and a sofa, and a little library of garden mags, and a kettle——- I want one!

-- Everyman, Cheshire, UK, www.gardeningforeveryman.com

View Greenthumb's profile

Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3513 days

posted 05-04-2009 07:07 AM

Nice job of it Scott

you might consider grabbing your chickens by the legs, holding them upside down and cutting their primary and secondary feathers short (doesnt hurt them)............whoever said chickens cant fly…........lied

Cheers

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

View XploreOrganics's profile

XploreOrganics

1393 posts in 3572 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 05-04-2009 08:46 AM

Need new chicken pics please :) They must be getting big now.

-- Xploreorganics, 5b Canada, LFD 06-20 http://colorfulcanary.blogspot.com/

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 05-04-2009 09:05 AM

Greenthumb: not much need to clip their wings. Once the run is done it will be covered. Also, for the benefit of anyone else who reads this, just clip one wing.. That leaves them off balance so they can not fly. Often times chickens can still fly to some degree with both wings clipped.

Everyman: Just wait until I start on the garden shed. Wife’s insisting that I put a porch on it. Still not sure where I’m going to put it, though. Since I expanded the garden, it kinda pushed the planned area a bit out of the way so now I’ve got to re-measure.

X: I’ll see if I can snap a few this afternoon for ya. They are getting quite big now and almost all their chick fluff is gone.

Still surprising how soft they are, though.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View Greenthumb's profile

Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3513 days

posted 05-04-2009 10:32 PM

u will learn

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 05-04-2009 11:07 PM

Oh? Do tell, Roman, What might I learn? Just wondering what I might be missing and all.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View Greenthumb's profile

Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3513 days

posted 05-04-2009 11:13 PM

“time” will teach you Scott

not me

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 05-04-2009 11:16 PM

But you seem like such a good teacher.. How sad.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View Greenthumb's profile

Greenthumb

2290 posts in 3513 days

posted 05-05-2009 07:32 AM

I clipped the feathers on my chickens for a few reasons.

It didnt matter how high I made the fence for their run…....they flew over it. Now I have a 4’ fence and they stay in the run instead of chewing my gardens down to a pasty green. No more dust holes under trees and shrubs.

Now when I walk into my coop, I dont experience the wonders of “flight”, the anarchy of birds flying into my face, or the faces of little children who want to collect an egg.

They no longer fly up and onto the “storage area” where I keep feed bags, tearing them open.

They are now a pleasure to deal with and I dont know why I didnt clip their feathers sooner.

Whatever floats your boat but if you do clip them, wait till its dark and they are roosting because its easy to gran their feet and when a bird is hung upside down, they are nice and calm, the wings fall making it easy, quick and painless.

-- just one more rock, and the garden is done ; )

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3693 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 05-05-2009 07:35 AM

oh don’t remind me about chicken claws in the face !! Oh right—THAT is why I don’t have chickens!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 05-05-2009 08:28 AM

See.. Now that wasn’t so hard was it? Though.. I already knew all that.. ;)

The run will be covered, moreover because of the massive amount of hawks in the area, not to mention all the turkey vultures.

The coop has a second, inner door which is sectioned off for storage and to keep them from trying to take off through the door when it’s first opened, or freaking out smacking me in the head because I’d caught them off guard.

The storage areas will have sections of tarp, tacked in place along the top and most likely velcroed along the bottom to keep the birds out. This will also cut the amount of poultry dust which will end up accumulating in those areas since they will basically be sealed off.

The only thing I did not know, or had not thought of was dealing with them when it’s dark and they go up to roost. Should be easy as pie to grab them and do what ever might be needed. I did know about the wings falling when hung upside down, but there’s also a minute possibility of their lungs collapsing when you do this, so leaving them hanging is a bad idea and doing what needs to be done quickly is best.

At any rate, I’d planned on clipping their right wings when it comes time to letting them run the yard (supervized) in limited numbers.

Anyway.. For those who wanted more pictures.. And I’ve got a small update as well…

Worked on the coop last night to finish the divider wall and get the door framed and screened. Since it’s the inside of the coop I decided just to go with chicken wire as opposed to the heavier grade hardware cloth that I used on the windows.

At this moment the roof is just tarped off. I’ve got the chickens section all sealed up however with hardware cloth on the windows and openings blocked so that they can hang out [out]inside for a while instead of sitting beside me while I work.

I’ll end up doing the windows last. Going with an awning window at the top and two out swing windows below.

This is a shot looking through the storage side window which is not screened yet. You can see the inner wall section and screened door here.

Better shot of the door. There is a 2×10 running along the bottom of the coop to support the wall and keep the shavings in. The door swings out, so you have to step into the coop to open it.

And now, some chicken pictures.. ;)

I’ve just got a light dusting of shavings down since they’re just in it for the day. I’ll end up cleaning these out, brushing the floor down good and placing a few box fans inside to speed drying of the floor (which is still somewhat wet) before giving it a good coat of porch paint.

It’s rather funny the interactions that you don’t get to see when they’re cooped up in a brooder. A little bit after I put them out on the floor they were chest bumping left and right vying for their position in the pecking order.

Oddly enough I think Emilia will be the alpha chicken. Darn bad girl complex.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

14694 posts in 3693 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 05-05-2009 08:37 AM

look at them strutting their stuff.
oh that white one… no no no… bad…. (oh the memories)

That’s quite the chicken coop. ... another reason I don’t have chickens—building the coop seems like way too much work!

-- - Debbie, SW Ontario Canada (USDA Hardiness Zone: 5a)

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 05-05-2009 09:02 AM

It’s only this much work because I’m making sure that it’s pretty… It is visible along with the front of the house, so want to make sure it’s nice looking.

I’d seen people on BYC toss together a structure in two days flat.. Rather amazing how much some people can get done.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View XploreOrganics's profile

XploreOrganics

1393 posts in 3572 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 05-05-2009 09:50 AM

Great pics, Lovely girls and very nice coop…Looks like you’ve done lots of research. I’ve never found the need to clip my birds wings, I’ve also never had any of mine fly at me and although many people do practice grabbing the birds by the legs, I’ve never done it as it can not only cause them to aspirate fluids into the lungs, it can damage their legs and joints. Happy birds that trust you should step into your lap and allow you to do what you need with them – for a treat, of course. Others I find just placing your ands over their wings makes it easy to pick them up. BTW love that gold laced crested girl.

-- Xploreorganics, 5b Canada, LFD 06-20 http://colorfulcanary.blogspot.com/

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 05-05-2009 10:12 AM

I think it really has alot to do with what breed chicken you have as to how they perceive your presence.. After all, many breeds are very flighty and spook easily so I think that’s a huge factor. Then again, some just might not have manners, or good aim; and are looking to roost on your shoulder. Regardless I chose these breeds exclusively due to their gentle nature, ease of handling, egg production and general demeanor.

I’m glad they’ve got some time outside… I was just out sitting with them for a while and watching them hop around.. It’s hilarious watching them launch at each other trying to butt chests. Even the little ones were getting into it, against the big roo boy.. ;)

Still not sure what he is.. He’s certainly not a Buff Orp, considering he’s white with yellow legs. I’m thinking he may be a sex-link roo.. I was playing with his feathers when he ran up to be petted and spotted several that were that reddish brown color waaaaaaaaay back near the quill. That or he’s a white rock. Not sure.

I’d been hand training them since they were little and treat training them since they were two weeks old or so.. Rice Krispies are a great treat and easy for them to break up so I don’t have to worry about their crop.

Overall they’re very easy to handle and will readily run up to you for attention and a scratching under the crop. The only one who isn’t as ready to be messed with seems to be the SL Wyandotte, which is the wifes fave.. The Barred Rocks LOVE to be messed with and are always first to you.

Glad you like the Polish.. She’s the cutest one of the bunch for sure. It was actually pot luck that we have her.. I wasn’t going to mess around with any Easter eggers but I figured what the heck, I’d grab one from the mixed pullets. She’s what I ended up with.

I think later on down the road once this crew is rotated out for new layers I might pick up a couple of Buff Silkies. Those things are more dog looking than anything I’d ever seen. Wild stuff.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View XploreOrganics's profile

XploreOrganics

1393 posts in 3572 days
hardiness zone 5b

posted 05-05-2009 10:59 AM

Yea silkies resemble a cross between a kitten and a Victoria Secret fuzzy slipper…these are hilarious:
http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u37/Donsmacs/chicken12.jpg

-- Xploreorganics, 5b Canada, LFD 06-20 http://colorfulcanary.blogspot.com/

View Scott Hildenbrand's profile

Scott Hildenbrand

1690 posts in 3465 days
hardiness zone 6b

posted 05-05-2009 11:19 AM

The only problem with silkies are they’re bantam only.. Not very good for eggs… Maybe a few frizzle would be better.

-- Planting Daylilies in Kentucky, zone 6b

View GrandmaT's profile

GrandmaT

5389 posts in 3571 days
hardiness zone 9

posted 05-05-2009 05:36 PM

well … coop is looking GOOD … and loved the updated photos of the “girls” ... that Polish Hen, I must admit is my fav … she is such a DIVA with that crown and coloring!!! :-)

-- "A beautiful garden is a work of heart" --

View Bon's profile

Bon

7374 posts in 3473 days
hardiness zone 5a

posted 05-06-2009 08:17 AM

Wow do they ever grow fast.I can’t believe how big they are already.

-- Bon,Hastings,Ont.....zone 5a....Always room for one more

View jacobreeve's profile

jacobreeve

4 posts in 486 days

posted 04-23-2016 09:35 AM

For some building materials, you can check this out http://caldwells.com/sliding-closet-door-hardware.

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